Leanne Hinton

Professor Emerita

Picture of Leanne Hinton
American Indian languages, endangered languages, language revitalization
Languages: Havasupai, California Indian languages
Ph.D., UCSD, 1975

Contact Information

Office: 1224 Dwinelle
Email: hinton@berkeley.edu
Phone: (510) 219-4842
Fax: (510) 643-5688
Web Site: http://www.linguistics.berkeley.edu/people/fac/hinton.html
Mailing address:
1203 Dwinelle #2650

Personal Statement

Leanne Hinton's recent research has focused on language revitalization of Native American languages.  She strongly supports interdisciplinary approaches to linguistics, and linguistic research that relates to community needs and interests, as well as to theory. Though recently retired, she remains active in teaching, research and consulting.  In 2006, she won the Lannan Foundation's Cultural Freedom Award.  In 2012 she was awarded the Language, Linguistics and the Public award by the Linguistic society of America.

Selected publications

RECENT  BOOKS:

BRINGING OUR LANGUAGES HOME: LANGUAGE REVITALIZATION FOR FAMILIES (Heyday Books, in press)

HOW TO KEEP YOUR LANGUAGE ALIVE (Heyday Books, 2002)

THE GREEN BOOK OF LANGUAGE REVITALIZATION IN PRACTICE (ed. with Ken Hale, Academic Press, 2001)

SELECTED RECENT ARTICLES:

2011 Language revitalization and language pedagogy: new teaching anlearning strategies. Language and Education, Volume 25, Issue 4, July 2011, pages 307-318

2011 Revitalization of endangered languages. In Handbook of Endangered Languages. Cambridge University Press.

2010 Language revitalization in North America and the new direction of linguistics. In Transforming Anthropology, Vol. 18, Number 1, pp. 36-42

2010 Arthur Spears and Leanne Hinton. Languages and speakers: an introduction to African American English and Native American languages. In Transforming Anthropology, Vol. 18, Number 1, pp. 36-42.

2008    Language Revitalization.  In Indians In Contemporary Society. Volume 2, Handbook of North American Indians. Smithsonian Institution.

2007    The Status of Indigenous Languages in the United States.  in Revitalizing the Periphery: Proceedings of the Saami language conference, Inari, Finland, November 14-15, 2002. 

2007    The languages of California.  In Vanishing Languages of the Pacific Rim, ed. By Osahito Miyaoka.  Oxford University Press.

2007    Learning and Teaching Endangered Indigenous Languages.  Encyclopedia of Language and Education, Springer Press.

2005    Racial nicknames and mascots for sports teams.  News from Native California, Vol. 19, No. 2, Winter 2005/06, pp. 37-39

2003.     How to teach when the teacher isn't fluent.  in  Nurturing Native Languages. ed. by Jon Reyhner, Octaviana Trujillo, Roberto Carrasco and Louise Lockard.  Northern Arizona University Press.  Also on the web: http://jan.ucc.nau.edu/~jar/NNL/NNL_6.pdf

(J) 2003    Language revitalization.  Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, Vol. 23, pp. 44-57. 

2003    What Ishi’s stories tell us about Ishi. (by Herb Luthin and Leanne Hinton.) in Ishi in Three Centuries.  Ed. By Karl Kroeber.   University of Nebraska Press.

2003    Endangered languages.  In International Encyclopedia of Linguistics, 2nd edition.  Ed. By William J. Frawley.  Oxford University Press.  Vol. 1, pp. 514-515.
 

"Involuntary language loss among immigrants." In Georgetown University Round Table in Language and Linguistics, 1999, pp. 203-252 (2001).

 2000    Involuntary Language Loss Among Immigrants: Asian-American Linguistic Autobiographies  (ERIC digest).  Center for Applied Linguistics.  http://www.cal.org/ericcll/digest/involuntary.html
(A shortened version of Hinton 2001.)


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