Tubatulabal

The Tubatulabal language was traditionally spoken along the upper Kern River, northeast of Bakersfield. In pre-contact times, there may have been as many as 1000 speakers of Tubatulabal (Kroeber 1925). Today, there are less than a dozen first-language speakers (Hinton 1993).

Tubatulabal (sometimes written "Tübatulabal" or called "Pahkanapul") is a Uto-Aztecan language. The other languages in this family spoken in California are the Numic languages (Chemehuevi-Southern Paiute-Ute, Comanche, Kawaiisu, Mono, Northern Paiute, Panamint, and Shoshone) and the Takic languages (Cahuilla, Cupeño, Gabrielino, Juaneño, Kitanemuk, Luiseño, Serrano, and Tataviam).

Grammatical information

Thumbnail sketch of Tubatulabal by Mary R. Haas, based on an oral report by C. F. Voegelin [PDF] (Haas.063)

Selected archival materials at Berkeley

Further reading

  • Voegelin, Charles F. 1935. Tübatulabal grammar. University of California Publications in American Anthropology and Ethnology 34: 55-190. [PDF]
  • Voegelin, Charles F. 1935. Tübatulabal texts. University of California Publications in American Anthropology and Ethnology 34: 191-246. [PDF]
  • Voegelin, C. F. 1958. Working dictionary of Tübatulabal. International Journal of American Linguistics 24: 221-228.

Links