Yurok dictionary

Writing system: default | hyphens | linguistic

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so

Dictionary entry

sopv • action in a particular direction • prep • to

Lexicon record # 3198 | Source references: R249 JE137

Sentence examples (133)

  1. Pue-lekw so neee'-no-wom'.
    You look downriver.

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    — Glenn Moore, Sentences (AG-10) (AG-10, 2008)

  2. Kes-kee kee so he-gok'.
    I'm going to go down at the river.

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    — Glenn Moore, Sentences (AG-10) (AG-10, 2008)

  3. Choo-lekw so neee'-no-wom'.
    You look down the hill.

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    — Glenn Moore, Sentences (AG-10) (AG-10, 2008)

  4. He-see pue-lekw 'o so neee'-no-wom', to' ro-'oh kue wer-'err-gerch.
    You look downriver, there's some alder standing there.

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    — Glenn Moore, Sentences (AG-10) (AG-10, 2008)

  5. Hee-koch hes 'o myah so hee-koh kue pa-'aahl?
    Did it jump across the water?

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  6. Kue 'o'-lehl... 'o le'-loyhl, nee-kee mo-'okw'. Kue 'o'-lehl so le'-loyhl.
    The house burned down in the fire, so it's gone. The house went up in flames.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  7. Wo-nue so nuer-'uern, re-goh 'o tep tue' weet 'o key.
    He climbed up and he is sitting in the tree.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  8. To' hes Wech-pues kee so me-ge-lom'?
    Will you go with me to Weitchpec?

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    — Georgiana Trull, Sentences (LC-01-2) (LC-01-2, 2007)

  9. Kerr-cherh kee laa-yek' so wo-nekw.
    I'm going up by that ridge.

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    — Glenn Moore, Discussion of hunting language and directional terminology (GM9, 2004)

  10. Wee-'eeet pue-leek ko so tme-gook'.
    I'm going to hunt downriver.

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    — Glenn Moore, Discussion of hunting language and directional terminology (GM9, 2004)

  11. Weet choo-lekw ko so tme-gook'.
    I'm going to hunt down the hill.

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    — Glenn Moore, Discussion of hunting language and directional terminology (GM9, 2004)

  12. Kue pue-leek weet soo-nekw weet cho' laas so he-goom'.
    You go on the path that goes downriver.

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    — Glenn Moore, Discussion of hunting language and directional terminology (GM9, 2004)

  13. Tue' wee-'eeet 'o so sloy-chok'w.
    Then he went down there.

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    — Georgiana Trull, Moon and His Wife (GT2, 2003)

  14. He-gom' so kue 'ek-so'!
    Walk to the door!

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 6: "Go get it" (GT3-06, 2003)

  15. Myoot-'es kue k'e-cheek'-weyr so kue 'o 'ee-'ee'-gah!
    Push your chair to the table!

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 6: "Go get it" (GT3-06, 2003)

  16. He-go-'och so kue muen-chey nah-ko'!
    Go to the white board!

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 6: "Go get it" (GT3-06, 2003)

  17. Cho' kwoy-choom' so kue 'o 'ee-'ee'-gah!
    Walk slowly to the table!

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 6: "Go get it" (GT3-06, 2003)

  18. Mos skuey' so chpok-sek'.
    I can't think good.

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 12: "How do you feel?" (GT3-12, 2003)

  19. Yo' so myoot-'es k'e-cheek'-weyr.
    Push your chair in.

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 18: "I'm going to school." (GT3-18, 2003)

  20. Ma he-gook' so Rek'-woy mech-kaa-pek'.
    I went on foot to Requa.

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    — Jessie Van Pelt, Sentences (JB-01-01) (JB-01-01, 2001)

  21. Cho' neee'-no-wom' kue so wo-nekw.
    Look up (at the mountain).

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    — Jessie Van Pelt, Sentences (JB-01-01) (JB-01-01, 2001)

  22. Wo-nekw so hoo-ney-yek' kee meyr-ke-we-chek'
    I'll get out of breath going up the steep hill.

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    — Violet Moore, Sentences (VM1) (VM1, 1994)

  23. Kues cho' soo ne-wom'? So pe-chue nue-mee kee-mer-lue'.
    How does it look to you? It looks really bad upriver.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-002) (LA138-002, 1980)

  24. Now keech so le-ko-yo'.
    It's flowing away from where I live.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-020) (LA138-020, 1980)

  25. 'O'le-peek so 'ek-so-yek'.
    They locked me in the house.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-021) (LA138-021, 1980)

  26. Won so lehl-ke-loy-pek'.
    I crawled away.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-021) (LA138-021, 1980)

  27. 'O'le-peek' so lehl-ke-pek'.
    I crawled inside.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-021) (LA138-021, 1980)

  28. Lekw-seek so lehl-ke-loy-pek'.
    I crawled out.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-021) (LA138-021, 1980)

  29. 'Ney-yaa-'eekso sue'-lo-wo-yek'.
    The water was splashing on me.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-025) (LA138-025, 1980)

  30. Cho' wo-nuek so ne-gaa-me-tem'.
    Step slowly (along a trail).

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-025) (LA138-025, 1980)

  31. Skuey' soo-ne-pek', keem' soo-ne-pek', I'm not dres-sed so good today mee kee-tee kol' hoh-kue-mek'.
    I'm dressed well, I'm not dressed well ... because I'm going to go to work.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-038) (LA138-038, 1980)

  32. Hee-koch so ne-ge-mek'.
    I carry it across.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-045) (LA138-045, 1980)

  33. So choo-lekw.
    (I) go downhill.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-046) (LA138-046, 1980)

  34. Kes-keek so mye-gah ha-'aag.
    A rock was jumping down (a rocky hillside).

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-054) (LA138-054, 1980)

  35. Wo-nue so nuer-'uern-cherrk'.
    I climbed up (over it).

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-056) (LA138-056, 1980)

  36. [Pishkaahl 'o koh hes wee' k'ee roh-tuen?] Roh-tuen kwel peesh-kaahl k'o koh, wey' kem k'o koh k'ee ne-kah 'we-rooy. So pe-chue roh-tuen.
    [Is the bullhead fish a pishkaahl 'o koh?] You can catch bullheads in the ocean, you can catch them in our stream. Bullheads are upriver.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  37. Pe-chues... so se-la re-chohl kue pe-gerk.
    The men were paddling upstream.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (RHR) (RHR, 1951)

  38. So 'oo-lekw 'o ro-'op' kue we'-yon.
    The girl ran in the house.

    — Georgiana Trull, Potato Boy (GT4, 2007)

  39. Kwe-see kue chee-no-me-wes so he-gokw', kwe-see tue' per-wer'-k'uek 'o soo-tokw'.
    And the young man left, and he went far south on the coast.

    — Georgiana Trull, Potato Boy (GT4, 2007)

  40. Tue' kel' 'o so kor' nee-mee kee rue-ro-wom' kee-tee chpee k'e-we-gaa-ney-yoo-chek' k'ee nee te-geyt-ko'hl kee shoo he-we-chem'.
    But you alone will not be able to sing so that you will just make noise foretelling evil in the canyons (and) so you will live.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Robert Spott's "The Owl" (GM1, 2004)

  41. Kwe-see koh-chee kem hee-koch sr 'ue-werh-per-yer-sek' kwe-see 'ap ne-wee' kol' nue-mee wo-gee 'o key ko-lo kol' sook nee nep'.
    Once as he was crossing over he saw something sitting right in the middle of it and apparently eating something.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Florence Shaughnessy's "The Fox and the Coon" (GM2, 2004)

  42. Noohl 'o ko neeen' so pue-lekw 'o new 'aa-wokw noohl kyue' keech we-no'-mo-nekw kue twe-goh.
    Then he looked down the river and saw the coon, poor thing, floating away there.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Florence Shaughnessy's "The Fox and the Coon" (GM2, 2004)

  43. Te'-noy' kue lo-chom', wok 'ee so chyuuek'-wen'
    The toad was offended so he just went to sit down over in the corner somewhere.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Florence Shaughnessy's "The Toad and The Mouse" (GM3, 2004)

  44. Mee' kee-mo-loohl mos ske-wok-seem' kel' kee kem nuuem' so yoh.
    [Explanation:] Because they're bad, one doesn't want (the rattlesnakes) to come back there.

    — Jessie Van Pelt, Rattlesnake medicine (JVP1, 2001)

  45. Tue' weet 'o soo kes-kee so ke-ro-moh ... 'ohl-kue-mee wo-'oohl ... kue ke-ro-moh.
    That's how the car got downhill, because the car ... with it.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  46. Kwe-see nah wo-nekw so nuer-'uern terl' wo-nekw 'o lem' nee-'ee-yehl kue chee-nes keech...
    So the young men climbed up, they went up ...

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Two Boys Kill a Donkey" (LA181-16, 1986)

  47. Noohl 'o ge's, Nek soo nee-nee so tmoo-loy. Ne-kah chyue kee lo-'o-mah.
    Then he thought, I think we shot it. We should run away.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Two Boys Kill a Donkey" (LA181-16, 1986)

  48. Mo-cho ker-gerk' so kes-kee, 'o ne-ge-mek' merw-perh, tue' 'ah-te-meyr me-ga-'e-po-yew.
    When I was alone down at the river, I brought food, and it was wrapped in paper.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Feeding Otters" (LA181-31, 1986)

  49. Soo ske-wok-see-mek' kue we'-yon, kwe-see so kwerm-hler-yerh.
    I so love the girl (he said), and he turned around in that direction.

    — Bessie Fleischman, "The Story of the Klamath River Song" (LA16-2, 1951)

  50. So nes Woh-pe-kue-mew 'ap neee'-now' 'o nes-kwe-chokw'.
    Wohpekumew came and looked and went back.

    — Lowana Brantner, "Wohpekumew and the Salmon" (LA16-3, 1951)

  51. Hee-noy so soo-tokw' 'o ne-wom', kwe-see wee-'eeet 'o guen-kek so pa-'aa-hleek.
    He went away behind and saw (the salmon), and so he opened (the way) to the water (of the river).

    — Lowana Brantner, "Wohpekumew and the Salmon" (LA16-3, 1951)

  52. Tue' we'yk-'oh, 'o gem', tue' 'ee-kee shon' kee 'we-laa-yem' so peesh-kaahl k'ee ne-puey, kee kwe-gom-hlem' mee' ke-ge-so-mew-tehl so mer'-wer-mery.
    And now, he said, it shall come to pass that (the salmon) shall go down to the sea, and that they shall return, because they are homesick, to the head of the river.

    — Lowana Brantner, "Wohpekumew and the Salmon" (LA16-3, 1951)

  53. Tue' kel' 'o so kor' nee-mee kee rue-ro-wom' keet chpee k'e-we-gaa-ney-yoo-chek' k'ee nee te-geyt-ko'hl kee shoo he-we-chem'.
    But you alone will not be able to sing so that you will just make noise foretelling evil in the canyons (and) so you will live.

    — Robert Spott, "The Owl" (LA16-4, 1951)

  54. Kwe-see koh-chee kem hee-koch so 'ue-werh-per-yerk-sek' kwe-see 'ap new kol' nue-mee wo-gee 'o key ko-lo kol' sook nee nep'.
    Once as he was crossing over he saw something sitting right in the middle of it and apparently eating something.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Fox and the Coon" (LA16-5, 1951)

  55. Noohl 'o ko neeen' so pue-lekw 'o new 'aa-wokw noohl kyue' keech we-no'-mo-nekw kue twe-goh.
    Then he looked down the river and saw the coon, poor thing, floating away there.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Fox and the Coon" (LA16-5, 1951)

  56. Kwe-see 'o te'-noy' kue lo-chom', kwe-see wok 'ee so chyuuek'-wen'.
    The toad was annoyed at this, and sat down at one side.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Toad and the Mouse" (LA16-6, 1951)

  57. Kem nee-kee 'we-ro' Se-gep hehl-kue nee raa-yor' so Hop-'ew.
    Then Coyote ran and came along the bank to Hop'ew (Klamath).

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  58. Noohl 'o schep-'oo; kue so schep-'oo noohl 'o ne-wee' kue hehl-kue 'we-le'-mek' kue 'ech-kwoh, kwe-see wo'hl tue' weesh ho re-wey-ye-tehl kue 'yoch.
    Then they landed; when they landed they saw that there were seals going ashore, and that it was they that had towed the boat.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  59. 'Aa-wokw, 'aa-wokw, 'we-le-pe-hlek' 'we-we-chek' kue 'ne-kue-chos, mee' nek soo nee-mee kom-chuem' k'ee kwe-nee so 'ne-me-ne-chok'.
    Alas, alas that my grandmother's life is a burden to her, as I fear that she does not know where I have disappeared to.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  60. Cher-wer-seek' ko-ma choo-moyhl noohl 'o gee', Cho woh-pey-yem', kue nek 'nep-sech, so Wehl-kwew.
    Seven days before my father was told, Cross over to Wehlkwew.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  61. Chmey-yo-nen 'o ge-gol' so hee-koh kue 'nep-sech.
    In the evening my father went across.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  62. Kue 'we-nahk-se-moyhl kue me-wee-mor 'em-see 'nep-sech noohl 'o goh-kue-mehl 'we-laa-yekw so kue nue-mee 'ue-pa-'aahl 'we-rek'-woy.
    On the third day the old man and my father built a path down to the water's edge at the river mouth.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  63. Kwe-lekw 'o te-nem' 'oohl 'o Wehlw-kew hee-koch so Rek'-woy so woh-pey-yem', 'ohl-kue-mee weet 'ee-nee me-ro-gey' kee 'we-hloohl 'we'-yoh 'em-see 'ue-pa-'ah 'ohl-kue-mee keech wee' laa-yekw keech 'o chah-chew kee 'we-hlo-yek' 'yohl-koych' 'o pue-lekw.
    And then there were a lot of people who crossed over from Wehlkwew to Requa, as it was easier there for them to get their wood and their water now that the path was finished and it was difficult for wood to be fetched at the river mouth.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  64. Noohl 'o gam' kue me-wee-mor ho kue 'nep-sech, Nek kee muech roh-see-mek' kue ne-puey, kem kee kel' wee 'o ne-ge-mem' so 'o'-lep.
    Then the old man said to my father, I shall spear the salmon myself, but you will carry it to the house.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  65. Kel' cho ke-nue-mee so-no-wom', 'em-kee kwe-lekw kuey' 'ue-pah-tuen kue k'es-me-choy kue k'e-ne-ko-me-wet kee so 'okw', kue 'ue-werhl k'e-ke-so-me-wet kee so 'okw', 'em-see k'e-roo-wo's kwe-lekw nue-mee k'ey-yaahl kee 'okw'.
    You do just as I do, and then the neck of your deerskin will be on your right, and its tail will be on your left, and your pipe will be right over your belly.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  66. Noohl 'o ko ska-'ehl-ken' hoh-kuem so pue-leek 'em-see so hehl-kew 'em-see so woh-pewk 'em-see so per-werh.
    Then he scattered tobacco to the north, to the east, to the west, and to the south.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  67. Nue-mee kue 'we-rek'-woy so neee'-no-wohl kue weesh 'o 'we-rek-'eeen.
    They were looking right at the river mouth where they sat.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  68. Noohl 'o me-ne'-mehl so heer, noohl 'o ko hlom' kue 'ue-ma-'ahs-kehl kue me-wee-mor reeek-'ew 'ee-kee laay' so pue-lekw.
    Then the men went away from the water, and the old man took his spear and went down to the river mouth along the shore.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  69. Noohl hee-noy 'o so na'-mee naa-met' ho kue 'we-ne-ko-me-wet noohl 'o gam', Se-la ro-'o-nep-'es! kem 'o pah-chew kue ne-puey.
    Then he took two steps to his right and said, Run on! and again it moved.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  70. Kue so ne-wo-nee keech chyuuek'-wen' kue me-wee-mor nee-kee 'ue-kwom-hle'-mek' kue pe-gerk kol' 'we-so'nk-'e-nuuem'.
    When the old man was seen to be sitting down the men came back to their fishing.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  71. Kue so heer soo-toh kue me-wee-mor ko-lo 'e-me le-kwo'hl 'ue-mey-kwe-luuem' 'o Rek'-woy, kue keech 'o koh-che-wo-nee kue ne-puey.
    When the old man went away from the water the air seemed full of wailing over at Requa, now that the salmon was caught.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  72. Kue pa-'aahl 'we-loo-tek' kue ha-'aag, wo-nue 'o le-gaa-yo', noohl pech-kue 'o so ke-lo-moh, noohl 'o me-nekw.
    When he threw the stone into the water, it ricocheted up, turned upstream, and then disappeared.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  73. Ha-see per-werw 'o so koo-'op' 'o kue ne-puey noohl 'o gam' kue me-wee-mor, Ch'ue-mey' 'ne-te-wo-mehl keech 'ne-koh-che-wo-chek'.
    The old man stood to the south of the salmon and said, I am so glad that I have caught you.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  74. Cho k'e-ne-ko-me-wet so ke-lo-mo-'o-pem' ko-wee-cho hee-noy so ko neee'-no-wom'; ko-wee-cho nek ho neee'-no-wo-pa', ko-wee-cho ho kol' hee neee'-no-wom'.
    Turn to your right and do not look back; do not look at me, and do not look at things round about.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  75. Kue raa-yor' so Pe-wo-lew k'ee 'oohl 'ee-kee toom' 'we-go-lehl, Kos cho 'e-la te-ne'-mehl k'ee ne-puey 'ne-peesh-kaahl, hehl-kue tue' kee nee te-nem' hoo-re'-mos, kee te-noo cheee'sh!
    When he made his way to Pewolew the people all shouted May there be many salmon in our sea, and many animals on land, and many woodpecker scalps!

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  76. Kue 'we-nes-kwe-chok' kue me-wee-mor 'o gam', Chue so 'o'-le-peek.
    When the old man came he said, Let us go into the house.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  77. 'O kue 'we-ne-ko-me-wet laa-ye-keen weet laa-tekw-som' mehl kue 'ue-mer-'erx so kue 'we-tuuek; noohl 'o tekw-see' kue 'we-terr, noohl kue 'we-tuuek.
    She cut it along the line on its right from its gills to its tail; then its head was cut off, then its tail.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  78. Cho nee-kee chue so he-chah.
    Go and send word to everyone.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  79. Tue' kne-we-teek' kem 'o ko choo-mo-'ol' noohl 'e-see ke-mey' so Rek'-woy.
    He stayed nine days before going home to Requa.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  80. Wee' 'o raa-yoh (?) kol' (?) kues kue no-'o-mek', kues kue so nah-kwek', kwen 'wes-yo-'oo-ge-chek'.
    ... it's long, long ... it acts like this, it makes whatever noise.

    — Lowana Brantner, Wohpekumew's Prediction (LA16-9, 1951)

  81. Kee lah-chue' so Koh-pey.
    They are making a voyage to Crescent City.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  82. Nek so ko ko-rek' 'ne-we-chek'.
    I was the sole survivor.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  83. Pekw-sue hes ne-kah ke-lew 'o me-ge-luue'-moh so Koh-pey?
    May we not go with you to Crescent City?

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  84. Pue-le-kuek so chween.
    He prayed to the north.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  85. Choo-lekw so sloy-chok'.
    I climbed down the hill.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  86. Hee-koch so he-goo-sek'.
    I am shouting across the water.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  87. Ne-kah naa-geen so myoo-ley-yo-noy.
    They pushed us aside.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  88. Kue roo-wo's weet so we-ge-noyhl.
    That is what the pipes were called there.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  89. Soo hee-moo-rey-yo-wohl ne-kah naa-geen so myoo-ley-yo-noy.
    They were in such a hurry that they pushed us aside.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  90. 'Upah-tuen kue k'es-me-choy kue k'e-ke-so-me-wet kee so 'okw'.
    The neck of your deerskin is to lie on your left.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  91. Na'-mee terr-luel' 'o 'we-luehl mee' kee sho kom-chuem' 'we-sek' wee-'eeet kue ho goh.
    He put two ridges round its mouth so that he should know that it was this one that he had made.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  92. Won 'o ko' so mue-rek'.
    Then I dodged in a different direction.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  93. Wok nee sho 'oo-lo'.
    He stood aside there.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  94. Kwe-see wok 'ee sho chyuuek'-wen'.
    So she sat on one side there.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  95. Wok cho nee sho 'oo-lo'!
    Stand over there!

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  96. Nek kee-tee he-gok' so Rek'-woy.
    I am going to Requa.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  97. Kee lah-chue' so Koh-pey 'o-wook.
    They are making a voyage to Crescent City tomorrow.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  98. Ke-neek'-wech-'os k'e'-yoch so hehl-kue!
    Steer your boat to the shore!

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  99. 'I le'-moh so pe-chue.
    We went up river.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  100. Myoot' ko-weesh so ske-leek.
    He pushed the pole down.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  101. Kues chperr-nerysh so ske-leek?
    How deep is it to the bottom?

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  102. To' nue-mee kaa-meg 'ee le'-moh so pe-chue.
    Although the weather was bad we went up the river.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  103. He-see', Kyaaneksok' 'ee nue ee-teen herhl-kerh, kwe-see so kyaa-nek-sok'.
    It was thought, I dug ... bulbs, and so I dug.

    — Robert Spott, No'och (RS1, 1933)

  104. Kwe-see kue we'-yon ma 'ap 'at 'ee-kee so myaahl-kep'.
    And the girl ... jumped.

    — Robert Spott, No'och (RS1, 1933)

  105. 'Ol' kas 'ee so sloy-chokw' reeek-'ew, 'o laay' so puel.
    He went just down the river a little ways, he went downstream along the edge of the river.

    — Mary Marshall, Coyote and Crane (MM3, 1927)

  106. Kwe-see' wo'-geek 'ee rek-'eeen 'woo-lohl, woop nee-kee laaych-ke-nekw' so pue-lekw.
    They were sitting inside their baskets, they were floating along downstream in the middle of the river.

    — Mary Marshall, Coyote and Crane (MM3, 1927)

  107. Kye kwen nee-kee le-nekw' kue 'e-kah so puel.
    The cap floated away down river.

    — Mary Marshall, Medicine formula to get wealthy (MM5, 1927)

  108. Kwe-see' woh-pue 'o so neee'-no-wom'.
    She looked towards the water.

    — Mary Marshall, Medicine formula to get wealthy (MM5, 1927)

  109. Kwe-see' 'o hlom' kue 'e-kah wo-'eeks so neee'-no-wom' 'o ne-wom' k'en 'oohl-ke's k'ehl nue-mee tom'.
    She picked up that cap, looked inside of it, and saw in it there lay something very small.

    — Mary Marshall, Medicine formula to get wealthy (MM5, 1927)

  110. Kwe-see' nee-kee 'ueme-ne-choh-kwek' Pekw-tuehl 'UKerr-cherhweesh-tue' laay' so wo-no-ye-'eek.
    Then right away she left Pekwtuhl Ridge and went to heaven.

    — Mary Marshall, Medicine formula to get wealthy (MM5, 1927)

  111. Tue' noo laay', wek tue' noo laay' so pech.
    He kept going along, he kept going upriver.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  112. Peesh kwe-see 'eesh-kuue ko'-moy' ko-lo kol' 'o chween-kep'. Ke-so-mehl ne-geeen' so hee-noo.
    Then he suddenly heard what seemed to be someone speaking to him. He looked back on his left side.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  113. 'O ne-geee'-now' so hee-noo. 'Oko, tee'-nee' 'wech-ween-ke-pek'? 'O new' kaap-'o-leehl yo' 'o pe-gah-chew.
    He looked back. Hey, who spoke to me? He saw a plant there moving around.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  114. Keyomohl cho' ket-'oh-pee-nem'. Cho' s'e-mem', tue' weet ko 'o so te-ge-rue-paa-nem'.
    Cook (me) in a basket dipper. Pound me up, then you will talk to me.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  115. Weesh-tue soo-sek', 'wwe-sek', Kues tue nek kee so hue-no-yohl?
    I think, Where shall I be transformed?

    — Captain Spott, Myth of Rock (Once a Woman) (Xd, 1907)

  116. Kues tue nek kee so lue-no-yohl-koyk?
    Where shall I be transformed?

    — Captain Spott, Myth of Rock (Once a Woman) (Xd, 1907)

  117. Weesh-tue weesh ha-sek', 'we-sek, Heeeee, Kues tue kee so hue-no-yohl-koyk'?
    I am thinking, Hiii, Where shall I be transformed?

    — Captain Spott, Myth of Rock (Once a Woman) (Xd, 1907)

  118. Tue weesh-tue 'o soo-nok's 'we-sek', Kues tue nek kee so hue-no-yohl?
    And so she thinks, Where shall I be transformed?

    — Captain Spott, Myth of Rock (Once a Woman) (Xd, 1907)

  119. Keech te-goo'-mehl k'ee me-gokw so wo-nekw, keech wer-'er-gery' kue ho me-wee-mor.
    The dogs went up together, those who were young and the old one.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Turip Young Man and His Dogs" (dictated version) (I1, 1906)

  120. Keech choo-lekw so 'wes-loy-chook'.
    He got downhill.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Turip Young Man and His Dogs" (dictated version) (I1, 1906)

  121. 'O lem', Tu' cho' so nee-wo wee' so-no-woom'.
    He said, Get ready.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Turip Young Man and His Dogs" (dictated version) (I1, 1906)

  122. ye-ruek (?) mo-kee cho' cha-pok (?) nok-see-mek' (?) wes-'o-nah so he-goo
    me know ... well, I guess you leave me tobacco.

    — Lame Billy, Gambling medicine formula (Ac, 1902)

  123. pue-le-kuech 'o so r' yer-'er-mer-wer-chek' 'o'-le-peek... mee-kee kee k'e-nes-kwe-chok'.
    sink down river, come home!

    — Susie of Wechpus, Menstruation medicine (recorded) (SW2, 1902)

  124. So pue-lek.. chuehl nee yee-merk'-ses, 'o'-loo-le-kwee-shol !
    Hurry downriver, village dweller!

    — Susie of Wechpus, Menstruation medicine (recorded) (SW2, 1902)