Yurok dictionary

Writing system: default | hyphens | linguistic

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son

Dictionary entry

sonvn • be, be like, happen, behave, do, be a kind of

Lexicon record # 3206 | Source reference: R250
Derivation: morphological structure son

Sentence examples (41)

  1. Mos nue-mee skue'y soo chwe-geen kue wen-chokws. Kol nee-mee 'oohl 'we-son.
    I don't like to talk to that woman. She's not nice.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  2. ... chey-ke-nee ko'l 'we-son kue 'ne-pee-cho-wos. ... nee-mee ma kom-chue-mek'.
    My grandfather died when I was a baby. I never met him.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  3. Woo-mehl mo keech pe'l so'n rook'ws, 'o pen-pe-noh kue woo-mehl.
    When the wind blows hard the acorns fall to the ground.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  4. Kues 'we-son?
    Why?

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    — Aileen Figueroa, Elicited Questions and Related Sentences (JB-17-1, 2005)

  5. Kues 'e-lekw 'we-son?
    I wonder why.

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 5: "What are you doing?" (GT3-05, 2003)

  6. 'Wr'err-gerch son.
    Orange (like alder bark).

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 14: "Colors" (GT3-14, 2003)

  7. Sko-yon son.
    Blue (like the sky).

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 14: "Colors" (GT3-14, 2003)

  8. 'Rrwerh son.
    Green (like the grass).

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 14: "Colors" (GT3-14, 2003)

  9. Pon-tet son.
    Gray (color of ashes).

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 14: "Colors" (GT3-14, 2003)

  10. Kues 'we-son?
    What's wrong?

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    — Aileen Figueroa, Sentences (JB-005_4) (JB-005_4, 2002)

  11. Wee' nue-mee so'n.
    That's really true.

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    — Jessie Van Pelt, Sentences (JB-01-03) (JB-01-03, 2001)

  12. Wee-'eeet wee' 'we-son.
    It is this way.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-014) (LA138-014, 1980)

  13. Wek nee-mee wee' 'we-son.
    This is not the same.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-014) (LA138-014, 1980)

  14. Keech wee' 'we-son.
    It is matched, it is finished, it is the same.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-014) (LA138-014, 1980)

  15. Ko-lo 'we-son we'yk-'oh woh-pue keech me-wech'.
    The wind is blowing from the river.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-014) (LA138-014, 1980)

  16. Kues 'we-son?
    What happened?

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-014) (LA138-014, 1980)

  17. Pyuech 'we-son.
    It's alright.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-033) (LA138-033, 1980)

  18. 'Yohl-koych' mehl hoh-kue'. 'Yohl-koych' wee' 'we-son.
    It's made of wood. It's like wood.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-046) (LA138-046, 1980)

  19. [Ti'nisho wee' k'ee heyr-puech?] Heyr-puech kwel me-ger-kue'm 'oohl, 'o te-gey-ke-lue'm, heyr-puech. Ko'l te-ge'y see kee 'we-son.
    [What is the ant?] Ants eat people up, they bite, ants. They're something like a flea.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  20. Tue' nee-keech-yue son hoo-re'-mos kue ch'uech-'eesh tue' kee rue-ro-woo'm.
    All the animals and the birds will be singing.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Robert Spott's "The Owl" (GM1, 2004)

  21. Tue' nee-keech-yue son hoo-re'-mos kue ch'uech-'eesh tue' kee rue-ro-woo'm.
    All the animals and the birds will be singing.

    — Robert Spott, "The Owl" (LA16-4, 1951)

  22. Weesh-tue' mehl hoh-kue'm woo-geen roo-wo's nue-mee 'we-son kue tee-kwo-nee, 'o-teesh no-'o-me'l.
    So he made another pipe just like the one that was broken; it was a foot long.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  23. 'Enue-mee wee' 'we-son tue' na-'a-mee terr-lue'l 'o 'we-luehl mee' kee soo kom-chue'm 'we-sek' wee-'eeet kue ho goh.
    It was just like the other, but he made two ridges round its mouth so that he should know that this was the one that he had made.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  24. 'O gee' cho', Knok-see-me'm kue 'woo-gey son k'es-lekw; kol-chee wohl-ke-chee' tue' ko' 'o nerr-ger-se'm, weet kee chpee 'o ne-pe'm kue me-wee-mor 'we-ro-mech 'ue-pe-wo-mek', 'ohl-kue-mee wok kem nee-ko'hl 'woh-ke-pek' tue' wok kee chpee pew mehl kue nee-'ee-yen pe-gerk.
    He was told, Leave behind your white man's type of clothes; every morning you will gather sweathouse wood, and you will only eat the old man's niece's cooking, because she too was always in training and she alone cooked for the two men.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  25. Che'-mekw keech 'o hue-mo-ne-pehl, noohl 'o ga'm kue me-wee-mor, Nek kue hlook' kue ma-'ahs-kehl; keech 'ee 'we-son kee 'ne-goo'-loh; nek kue hlook' kue k'e-ka'.
    They warmed themselves a little, and then the old man said, I will fetch the spear; now we are ready to go; I will bring your blanket.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  26. Noohl 'o ga'm, To's keech 'ee 'we-son kee 'ne-goo'-loh?
    Then he said, Is all ready for us to go?

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  27. 'O hehl-keek 'o le'-moh (?) son ko'l see chpaa-nee-keen.
    We went inland, ... it was a long way.

    — Lowana Brantner, Wohpekumew's Prediction (LA16-9, 1951)

  28. Ke-ro-moh kue son yo'-mo-kee ro-'o-mah.
    Vehicles ran around.

    — Lowana Brantner, Wohpekumew's Prediction (LA16-9, 1951)

  29. Wee-'eeet wee' 'we-son.
    This is the same.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  30. Wek nee-mee wee' 'we-son.
    This is not the same.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  31. Kues 'we-son?
    How did it happen?

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  32. Nee-mee skue'y 'we-son.
    It is not good that it should have happened.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  33. Skue'y k'e-son!
    Good for you!

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  34. Ko ge-sey-yek' skue'y 'ne-son.
    I shall be thought to be doing right.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  35. Kues 'we-son ke-lach ho ko mehl nahch-pue'm cheee-ko'l 'we-sook?
    How did it happen that he gave you all his things?

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  36. Kues son ke-lew keech mehl mee' kweee-get?
    Why don't you all come visiting?

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  37. Kues 'e-lekw 'we-son mehl me-la te-lo-ye'w.
    I wonder why she told a lie.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  38. Kues 'e-lekw 'we-son.
    I wonder how it happened.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  39. Kues son keech mehl mee' kweee-get?
    Why don't you all come visiting now?

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  40. Kues 'we-son mehl me-la te-lo-ye'w?
    Why did she tell a lie?

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  41. Peesh weesh-tue' 'o soo-nok's, 'we-sek', Mos weesh-tue' pyuech 'we-son mo-cho kee mok'w 'ue-pa-'ah kwe-lekw weesh kee mehl hoo-le'm kee-kee 'woo-le'm.
    So then he thought, thinking, "It will not be right if they have no water (when) they go around there and live there."

    — Pecwan Jim, "Upriver Coyote" (T8, 1907)