Yurok dictionary

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tue'

Dictionary entry

tue'conj • and, but [sentence conjunction]

Lexicon record # 3737 | Source references: R259 JE25

Sentence examples (256)

  1. Tue' weet 'o pkwekoyo' yo'.
    It (water) comes out of the ground there.

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    — Glenn Moore, Sentences (AG-10) (AG-10, 2008)

  2. Tue' weet mehl tewomehlkok' kee 'ne-laayolahkee 'ne-saa'agochek'.
    I'm glad you're teaching me how to speak Yurok.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  3. Nuemee pel' son'... k'ee 'ne-too'mar, tue' nuemee tewomehlkok' kee 'ne-komchuesek'.
    It's very important ... you are my good friend, and I'm glad I know you.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  4. Wonue so nuer'uern, regoh 'o tep tue' weet 'o key.
    He climbed up and he is sitting in the tree.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  5. Tue weet hoolen'... kue 'we-kuechos hegoh 'o... kue 'we-skery, 'we-skery ho hool.
    She is wearing the dress her grandmother made.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  6. Ko'moyok' 'we-ch'uech'eesh. Tue' kues 'w-ew? Neemee komchuemek'.
    I hear his bird. But what's it called? I don't know.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  7. Wo' tue' skewok kee k'e-tegerew.
    He wants to talk to you.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  8. Wee' chpee mehl pel' soo hlmeyowok', kue 'ne-sonkopa'. Tue weet pel' soo hlmeyowok'.
    That's why I'm mean, because of what you did to me. That's why I'm mean.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (AG-07-1) (AG-07-1, 2006)

  9. Tue weet 'ne-sonoyopa', ho weet 'ne-sonkopa'.
    You treated me like that.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (AG-07-1) (AG-07-1, 2006)

  10. Tue weet 'ne-sonkopa'. Tue' kolnee kee hoo'yk'... kolnee kee mo ko 'ne-t'p'ohlkwek'.
    That's how you treated me. I'm going to lose I'm kind of going to lose my senses.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (AG-07-1) (AG-07-1, 2006)

  11. Sega'anee tue' 'ue-kergert.
    S/he often goes fishing.

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    — Jimmie James, Elicited Sentences About Repeated Events (EJW-01-1-1, 2006)

  12. Tue' sega'anee neemee wee' 'ook'.
    Sometimes I'm not there.

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    — Jimmie James, Elicited Sentences About Repeated Events (EJW-01-1-1, 2006)

  13. Tue' kues kee soo nepuey mehl 'e'gah.
    So how are we going to eat salmon?

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    — Jimmie James, Elicited Sentences About Repeated Action (EJW-01-1-3, 2006)

  14. Sega'anee tue' pel' soo skuey'.
    Sometimes it turns out real beautiful.

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    — Jimmie James, Elicited Sentences About Emphasis (EJW-01-1-4, 2006)

  15. Tue' keech ko toktom'.
    It's in small pieces.

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    — Jimmie James, Elicited Sentences About Plurals and Repeated Events (EJW-01-2-1, 2006)

  16. Tue' keech kem won ho teekwohsee'.
    It's been broken badly.

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    — Jimmie James, Elicited Sentences About Plurals and Repeated Events (EJW-01-2-1, 2006)

  17. Maageen popeleen, maageen popeleen, maageen tue' chegeykenee nepuey, maageen tue' regok.
    Some (salmon) are big, some are big, and some salmon are small, and some are trout.

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    — Aileen Figueroa, Elicited Sentences About Animals (AG-01-2, 2004)

  18. Kel' tue' kues sonowom'?
    And how are you?

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 2: "How are you?" (GT3-02, 2003)

  19. Kelew tue' kues sonowo'mow'?
    And how are you (pl.)?

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 2: "How are you?" (GT3-02, 2003)

  20. Kel' tue' kues sonem'?
    And how are you?

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 2: "How are you?" (GT3-02, 2003)

  21. Kel' tue'?
    And you?

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 2: "How are you?" (GT3-02, 2003)

  22. Kemes tue'!
    Go home then!

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 7: "Okay. Expressions" (GT3-07, 2003)

  23. Kues tue' k'e-cheeek?
    How much money you got?

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 13: "One, two three..." (GT3-13, 2003)

  24. Kue kuechos 'o hem', Kues tue' segon'?
    The grandmother said, How do you do it?

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    — Glenn Moore, Coyote and His Grandmother (GM11, 2002)

  25. Neekeechyue soo hoore'mos kue ch'uech'eesh tue' kee reguuerowom'.
    All the animals and the birds will be singing.

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    — Glenn Moore, Sentences (JB-03-1) (JB-03-1, 2002)

  26. Kue nee'eeh tue' kolnee tel'.
    The person I'm living with is kind of sick.

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    — Glenn Moore, Sentences (JB-03-1) (JB-03-1, 2002)

  27. Kel' tue' kues ho 'oom'?
    Where do you come from?

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    — Jessie Van Pelt, Sentences (JB-01-03) (JB-01-03, 2001)

  28. Swewetek', tue' 'o koma nepek'.
    I'm sick of it, but I'll still eat it.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-013) (LA138-013, 1980)

  29. Tue' 'w-ooror'.
    Then he went running around.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-014) (LA138-014, 1980)

  30. Tue' ner'er'eryhl.
    There were two (animals or birds).

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-015) (LA138-015, 1980)

  31. Keech wee' 'ela reweeshee', tue' keech nahko' 'wee keech 'o werhperyerk's.
    There were sticks there, and a board across it.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-021) (LA138-021, 1980)

  32. Wo'oot kem megel', wonew weno'eem' tue' wo'oot kem megel'.
    That person went along too, they're walking along and that person is going along with them too.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-021) (LA138-021, 1980)

  33. Wonew weno'eem' tue' yo'oot kem megel'.
    They're walking along and that person is going along with them too.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-021) (LA138-021, 1980)

  34. Tepoonoy' ra'ayor', tue' puelekuek keech 'o pkwo'rep', keech pkwo'rep'.
    It runs into the forest, downriver and out into the open.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-022) (LA138-022, 1980)

  35. Tue' 'o hehlkue 'o ruerek', naamenewkwek'.
    I swam to shore, I was pulled in by the waves.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-025) (LA138-025, 1980)

  36. Pahpeech tue' now 'o sootok'.
    It is better if I left.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-028) (LA138-028, 1980)

  37. Newoom' hes? Kel' hes kem newoom'? 'Ee, nek kem newook'. Yo'... wo'hl tue' kem newoohl.
    Did you see it? Did you see it too? Yes, I saw it. That one ... they saw it too.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-031) (LA138-031, 1980)

  38. Kel' wek keech 'o mekwehl k'e-koweesh, nek, tue' wek keech 'o mekwehl 'n-a'aag.
    You've piled up your sticks there, and I've piled up my rocks here.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-039) (LA138-039, 1980)

  39. Keech hegokw' tue' wee' meykwelehl.
    He's gone away and they are mourning.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-057) (LA138-057, 1980)

  40. [Kus soo tepoo yok nee huenem'?] Weet kem skuueyenee tepoo, weet tue' 'o hohkue' k'ee yok nee tepoo. Pechue nee tepoo kem skuueyen'.
    [What kinds of trees are around here?] Tepoo is good, you can pick tepoo around here. Upriver tepoo is good also.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  41. [Kus soo nepoyoch yok nee huenem'?] Sekws tue' skuueyen', kweech kem skuueyen'. Negepue' yok nee nep.
    [What kinds of greens are around here?] Wild celery is good, kwich is good too. You eat the ones that grow around here.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  42. [Nunepuy hes wee' k'ee mekwchoh?] K'ee mekwchoh tue' pegerk wee' negepee' mekwchoh.
    [Is the sea snail a nunepuy?] Menfolks eat that, snails.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  43. [Nunepuy hes wee' k'ee ko'ses?] Ko'ses tue' kem negepue' wee', k'ee ko'ses.
    [Is the crab a nunepuy?] Crab is also eaten, crab.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  44. [Hoore'mos hes wee' k'ee neekwech?] 'Ee, 'o hlmeyowonee wee'. Chuelue mos ho legey' 'oohl. Weet ho 'oolem' weet soo. Tue' neemee wee hoolegey' 'oohl keech 'o merkue' mocho keechee' laay 'oohl. Se'nee kwel neemee wo nep'. Mo newom' 'oohl 'eekee 'ee, 'ohlkuemee tergerwermee' mehl kee'ee. 'Okw' soo tergerw' neekwech.
    [Is the grizzly bear a hoore'mos?] Yes, he's mean. A person couldn't go through Bald Hills. They used to live there. A person couldn't go through, he'd get eaten up, if a person goes through there. Sometimes he wouldn't eat you, when he sees a person he'll run away, they talk to him and scare him away. There is a way to speak to a grizzly.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  45. [Hoore'mos hes wee' k'ee nepe'weeshneg?] 'Ee, teen' tue' mehl hee' nepe'weeshneg. Neekeechue 'we-nepek'.
    [Is the otter a hoore'mos?] Yes, that's why he's called otter. He eats anything.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  46. [Hoore'mos hes wee' k'ee ch'ek'ch'ek'?] Ch'ek'ch'ek' tue' kem hegohkuem' kee 'we-ten. Hlmeykee' keech 'o tenpewe'hl.
    [Is the wren a hoore'mos?] Wren can make rain. If you disturb him it will rain.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  47. [Hoore'mos hes wee' k'ee k'err'?] K'err' tue' kem megeskweta' mocho kol' 'oo' nuenepuey keech 'ue-merkuem'. K'err' weeshtue' soo kee'molen'. Keech 'ue-kem'.
    [Is the crow a hoore'mos?] Crow will eat it up, wherever there's food he'll eat it up. That's why crow is no good. He steals.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  48. [Hoore'mos hes wee' k'ee hlkerrwers?] Hlkerrwers tue' kegahseluem' 'oohl.
    [Is the lizard a hoore'mos?] Waterdog is a stranger to people.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  49. [Hoore'mos hes wee' k'ee lochom'?] 'Ee, weet tue' kem kee hlmeykom' mocho kee yo hoolenah keehl meykoyem'.
    [Is the toad a hoore'mos?] Yes, that can harm you also if you disturb them, they can hurt you.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  50. [Hoore'mos hes wee' k'ee 'yekwhl?] 'Yekwhl tue' kem kee merkew kelech'.
    [Is the maggot a hoore'mos?] Maggots can eat you too.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  51. [hoore'mos hes wee' k'ee regook?] K'ee regook tue' kem kee nepue' mocho keech 'o koh.
    [Is the trout a hoore'mos?] You can eat trout when you catch it.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  52. [Hoore'mos hes wee' k'ee 'o'rowee'?] 'O'rowee' tue' kem kegahselue'mow'.
    [Is 'o'rowi' a hoore'mos?] 'O'rowi' is also a stranger to people.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  53. [Hoore'mos hes wee' k'ee sa'ro'?] Sa'roh heseesh waak? Sa'roh tue' lochom' wee', tue'ee nepue'.
    [Is the sea anemone a hoore'mos?] Does he mean sa'roh? Searoses is a frog, but they eat it.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  54. [Hoore'mos hes wee' k'ee kwegeruer'?] 'Ee, kwegeruer' tue' kem kee nep' 'oow.
    [Is the pig a hoore'mos?] Yes, pig will eat a person.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  55. [Leyes hes wee' k'ee chergercheryerh?] 'Ee, hlmeyowom' kwel wo'hl tue'. ... looks leeke rattlesnake.
    [Is the kingsnake a leyes?] yes, they are mean. ... looks like rattlesnake.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  56. [Ti'nisho wee' kue tegey'?] Tegey' tue' megerkuem' 'oohl.
    [What are fleas?] Flea eats people up.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  57. [Ti'nisho wee' kue chohpos?] Chohpos tue' kem megarkuem' 'oohl, 'o reksem'.
    [What are flies?] Fly eats people too, it lays eggs.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  58. [Ti'nisho wee' kue wes?] Wes tue' kem tegeykeluem', 'o negohsehl.
    [What are spiders?] Wherever a spider bites, it'll swell up.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  59. [Kaap'ehl hes wee' k'ee sloowehl?] Sloowehl tue' kem ho negepue'... Wee' negepue' k'ee sloowehl.
    [Is the wild oat a kaap'ehl?] We used to eat wild oats. We eat wild oats.

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    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  60. Tue' weet 'ee mehl 'w-ew kue Tege'muer tue' weeshtue' nee shoo nohsuenowohl.
    And that is why their name is Snowbird, and so they grow like that.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Robert Spott's "The Owl" (GM1, 2004)

  61. Tue' weet mehl 'w-ew wey' kue Tege'muer tue' weeshtue' nee shoo nohsuenowohl.
    And that is why their name is Snowbird, and so they grow like that.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Robert Spott's "The Owl" (GM1, 2004)

  62. Kel' kwelekw k'ee soo no'omuenowonee k'ee 'wes'onew tue' k'ee nee tegeytko'hl kee chpee 'e'goloyew.
    As long as the heavens endure you will just be hooting in the canyons.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Robert Spott's "The Owl" (GM1, 2004)

  63. Tue' neekeechyue son hoore'mos kue ch'uech'eesh tue' kee ruerowoom'.
    All the animals and the birds will be singing.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Robert Spott's "The Owl" (GM1, 2004)

  64. Tue' kel' 'o so kor' neemee kee ruerowom' keetee chpee k'e-wegaaneyoochek' k'ee nee tegeytko'hl kee shoo hewechem'.
    But you alone will not be able to sing so that you will just make noise foretelling evil in the canyons (and) so you will live.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Robert Spott's "The Owl" (GM1, 2004)

  65. Tue' weet too' 'we-tekwe's 'we-'er'gerp.
    And thus ends the story of the owl.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Robert Spott's "The Owl" (GM1, 2004)

  66. Kue negeneech tue' kem wee' 'o gegokw', kolonee wee' neenee hak'ws.
    The mouse, he was there too, and he was kind of laughing to himself, kind of giggling around to himself.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Florence Shaughnessy's "The Toad and The Mouse" (GM3, 2004)

  67. Tue' wee'eeet 'ela nuuem' otters, tue' keech 'o tenem' mee' wee'eeet 'o 'uuekseyem'.
    And otters came there, and there were a lot of them, because they gave birth there.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Otters" (LA181-2, 1986)

  68. Tue' nekah ho 'okw' 'ne-ch'eesh, and it was a collie.
    And we had a dog, and it was a collie.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Otters" (LA181-2, 1986)

  69. Mocho keech high tide, 'yohlkoych' che'woreesh hehlkue 'o lechkenekw, tue' weet 'ela hegoh 'ne-'yoh.
    When it was high tide, wood drifted up on shore, and we would gather our wood.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Otters" (LA181-2, 1986)

  70. Tue' kue 'ne-ch'eeshah neeege'yoh.
    I took my dog with me.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Otters" (LA181-2, 1986)

  71. Tue' wee'eeet 'o ro'opek' nek weet 'ema kol' kegohtoh (?) kue otter, 'o ko hlook' kue 'ne-ch'eesh.
    And I ran there, ..., I grabbed my dog.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Otters" (LA181-2, 1986)

  72. Tue' wohpue 'eenee rek'eeen 'o neee'nowohl 'we-skuey' soo keech sootokw' 'we-ch'eeshah.
    And they sat in the water and looked to see where the dog had gone.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Otters" (LA181-2, 1986)

  73. Tue' noohl 'o le'moh, 'ne-kew nue hegoh 'yohlkoych'.
    Then we left, we went gathering wood in our burden basket.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Otters" (LA181-2, 1986)

  74. And cheeeshep' tue' huenem' nee wee', tue' weet kem 'o hoh.
    And flowers grew around there, and we gathered them too.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Otters" (LA181-2, 1986)

  75. Tue' k'ee otter keskee, period.
    These otters down below, period.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Otters" (LA181-2, 1986)

  76. 'O gem', Chuue', tue' ... koypoh kee le'moh.
    He said, Well, we'll leave in the morning ...

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  77. Noohl kem 'o le'moh tue' won keet keromoksee'hl.
    Then we set out again and it started to turn differently (?).

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  78. Tue' weet 'o kol' tekwsom'.
    He cut something.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  79. Tue' weet heenoy ... 'o letkweloyhl.
    They were dragged behind.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  80. Tue' weet 'o soo keskee so keromoh ... 'ohlkuemee wo'oohl ... kue keromoh.
    That's how the car got downhill, because the car ... with it.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  81. Tue' weet 'ema hlo 'ohpew merwperh.
    Then he was given food.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  82. Tue' wee'eeet kem 'o kol' soo kemeye'moh.
    And then we headed home.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  83. Tue' weet kem 'o k'enego'ohl keech 'oolo'oh kue muelah kue wonue kem 'o le'moh.
    The horses ... were often standing.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  84. Kwesee pa'aahl 'o lehlkoo', tue' kue wee'eeet ... 'o keepuen toy 'o lechkenem' kue ... toomok's kue cement.
    And it fell into the water, and in the winter here they threw big pieces of cement there.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Klamath Bridge" (LA181-10, 1986)

  85. Tue' kolchee plop', kem 'o kaamop' 'o yue'.
    And whenever it flooded, the water was rough there again.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Klamath Bridge" (LA181-10, 1986)

  86. Tue' wee'eeet nek soo, mehl mee' skuey' soo 'okw' 'o puelekw, skuey' soo rek'woyk k'ee pa'ah, 'ohlkuemee skeleek wee'eeet, hesek' nek.
    This is what I think, because it's good at the river mouth, the water is good at the river mouth, because it's down there, I think.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Klamath Bridge" (LA181-10, 1986)

  87. Skeleek nee 'oo' wee'eeet tue' kue cement kue ho werhperyerh 'o kem mee' 'ee keech mo'okw' 'o yo' 'ohlkuemee kee lewolah mos cheetaa kol' sook kohchewohl.
    It's down below, the cement that used to be a bridge, because it's not there anymore, because ... they couldn't catch anything at all.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Klamath Bridge" (LA181-10, 1986)

  88. Kwelekw wo' 'o tue' weesh kee heemen kohchewohl mocho wee' skelee keech wo' 'oo' 'o yo'.
    Well, they could catch it fast when it was down there.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Klamath Bridge" (LA181-10, 1986)

  89. Kwelekw keech nek hesek' puelekw wo'oot tue' weesh keet hohkuem' 'ue-kaamopek''o puelekw.
    I think that's what started to make the mouth of the river rough.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Klamath Bridge" (LA181-10, 1986)

  90. Kwesee yok suewee eyk 'eketkwelee' kue 'we-nah kue ka'ar chekas nekah ho soo hee' tue' weetee' 'eketkwelee'.
    And his donkey was tied up there with him.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Two Boys Kill a Donkey" (LA181-16, 1986)

  91. Tue' noohl 'o nah 'o neee'nowohl noohl 'ee 'o lo'omah wee' 'o key Todd Horn.
    And then they looked around and ran back to where Todd Horn was sitting.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Two Boys Kill a Donkey" (LA181-16, 1986)

  92. Mocho kergerk' so keskee, 'o negemek' merwperh, tue' 'ahtemar mega'epoyew.
    When I was alone down at the river, I brought food, and it was wrapped in paper.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Feeding Otters" (LA181-31, 1986)

  93. Tue' 'o new kyue' neenee kuereem'.
    I saw them floating around there.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Feeding Otters" (LA181-31, 1986)

  94. Tue' po roo, pa'aahl 'ela roo, 'o new keech weno'omuer', keech ma hloom'.
    ... I threw it in the water and saw them swim, and they took them.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Feeding Otters" (LA181-31, 1986)

  95. Tue' wee'shk'oh 'enuemee wee' son'.
    And today that is just what he is doing.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Mourning Dove" (LA16-1, 1951)

  96. Tue' son' keetkwo 'ue megey wee'shk'oh.
    And so it is that he still mourns today.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Mourning Dove" (LA16-1, 1951)

  97. Tue' weet 'ee mehl 'o son' kee ho 'w-oole'mow' heekon, mos kol' kee nee nosep'.
    And that is why people lived like that in former times, and nobody could marry into a family in the west.

    — Bessie Fleischman, "The Story of the Klamath River Song" (LA16-2, 1951)

  98. Tue' nee shoo neekee ko'moy' kue keet 'we-ruerowoom'.
    And then he heard them begin to sing.

    — Bessie Fleischman, "The Story of the Klamath River Song" (LA16-2, 1951)

  99. Nekah kwehl 'wer'errgerch wee'eeet nepee'moh 'eenee kegoh puuek, tue' wee'eeet chpee kee 'o k'e-nahchelek'.
    So we eat alder bark, and we catch more deer, and this is all you can be given here.

    — Lowana Brantner, "Wohpekumew and the Salmon" (LA16-3, 1951)

  100. Kwesee 'o gem', Chuue', Tue' kee yegok', kwesee 'o legol'.
    And so he said, Well, I will be going, and he went.

    — Lowana Brantner, "Wohpekumew and the Salmon" (LA16-3, 1951)

  101. Tue' weet 'ee mehl son' we'yk'oh k'ee 'we-roy 'ue-kerkue'yermery teytko'hl mee' keech 'o komchuem' 'w-esek' heenoy keech 'o gegokw'.
    That is how it came about that today the bends in the river are sharp because he knew that (the daughter of the head of the river) was coming after him.

    — Lowana Brantner, "Wohpekumew and the Salmon" (LA16-3, 1951)

  102. Tue' we'yk'oh, 'o gem', tue' 'eekee shon' kee 'we-laayem' so peeshkaahl k'ee nepuey, kee kwegomhlem' mee' kegesomewtehl so mer'wermery.
    And now, he said, it shall come to pass that (the salmon) shall go down to the sea, and that they shall return, because they are homesick, to the head of the river.

    — Lowana Brantner, "Wohpekumew and the Salmon" (LA16-3, 1951)

  103. Tue' we'yk'oh nekah k'ee 'oohl k'ee laayoh mehl negepee'moh nepuey.
    And today we Indians eat salmon regularly from the river.

    — Lowana Brantner, "Wohpekumew and the Salmon" (LA16-3, 1951)

  104. Tue' weet 'ee mehl 'w-ew wey' kue Tege'muer tue' weeshtue' nee shoo nohsuenowohl.
    And that is why their name is Snowbird, and so they grow like that.

    — Robert Spott, "The Owl" (LA16-4, 1951)

  105. Kel' kwelekw k'ee soo no'omuenowonee k'ee 'wes'onah tue' k'ee nee tegeytko'hl kee chpee nee 'e'goloyew.
    As long as the heavens endure you will just be hooting in the canyons.

    — Robert Spott, "The Owl" (LA16-4, 1951)

  106. Tue' neekeechyue son hoore'mos kue ch'uech'eesh tue' kee ruerowoom'.
    All the animals and the birds will be singing.

    — Robert Spott, "The Owl" (LA16-4, 1951)

  107. Tue' kel' 'o so kor' neemee kee ruerowom' keet chpee k'e-wegaaneyoochek' k'ee nee tegeytko'hl kee shoo hewechem'.
    But you alone will not be able to sing so that you will just make noise foretelling evil in the canyons (and) so you will live.

    — Robert Spott, "The Owl" (LA16-4, 1951)

  108. Tue' weet too' 'we-tekwe's 'we-'er'gerp.
    And thus ends the story of the owl.

    — Robert Spott, "The Owl" (LA16-4, 1951)

  109. Noohl k'ee wek 'we-raayoy 'we-heerkeek 'o wohpeyar' tektoh, tue' wee'eeet reeegaayor' kue wergers k'enego'hl kem keech kyue' weno'omor'.
    In those days way back in this creek a log lay across the water, and a fox used to cross over on it and was often running there.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Fox and the Coon" (LA16-5, 1951)

  110. Kue kel' kwelekw 'okw' k'-ekwol 'o heema'erk'uek tue' wee 'o kegemolem'.
    You have your own fishing place underneath and are always stealing there.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Fox and the Coon" (LA16-5, 1951)

  111. Kwesee hlow wohpuek 'o lekon' kue twegoh tue' koma soo hem', Mos kelee' k'-ekwol.
    At last it fell down into the water, but it was still saying, It is not your fishing place.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Fox and the Coon" (LA16-5, 1951)

  112. Kue negeneech tue' kem wee' 'o gegokw', kolo wee' neenee hak'ws 'w-esek', Kwelekw soo mermeryerwerk', Nek kem kue hlkyorkwek'.
    The mouse was walking around there too, she was laughing around a bit, thinking, Well, I am good looking, I will go and watch too.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Toad and the Mouse" (LA16-6, 1951)

  113. Noohl heekon pecheek ho 'okw' perey, tue' wo'oot ho 'ok'ws 'ue-k'ep'ew.
    Once upon a time an old woman lived up the river, and she had her grandson there with her.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  114. Tue' 'o chahchew ho soo megetohlkwom' kue 'ue-k'ep'ew.
    It was difficult for her to look after her grandson.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  115. Tue' keet 'o skuey' soo 'okw' kue perey mee' neeko'hl kol' 'we-so'nk'enek' kue mewah.
    And then the old woman began to live better because the boy was always catching something in his fishing.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  116. Keet 'o pel' 'emkee k'ee toomenee sonowonee ch'uech'eesh tue' nuemee chue kegohchew', kem 'o gem' kue perey:
    He began to get bigger and then he would catch all sorts of birds, and the old woman said:

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  117. 'Emkee keech 'o nuemee pel' keech 'o cheenomewes, tue' weet son' chpee 'we-tmeeegok'.
    Then he quite grew up and became a young man, and it turned out that all he did was to hunt.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  118. Kwesee 'ap ham', Hahl neee'nes, kuech, kwelekw keech kohchewok', tue' nek ka'ar wee' kee yoh.
    And he said, Look, grandmother, I have caught this, and I will make it a pet.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  119. Kolchee kol' sootokw' kue cheenes kem tue' sega'nee poy 'o chee nue raayor' kue 'ue-ka'ar.
    Whenever the young man went anywhere his pet would often run right on ahead of him.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  120. Keech 'o pel' kue ka'ar, tue' 'o segon' sega'anee 'o menechokw'.
    The pet grew up, and it often happened that it disappeared in these runs.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  121. Kem tue' negeee'now' sega'nee noohl sohchee 'ue gak'ws.
    And he would look for it and frequently found it high up in the hills.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  122. Tue' 'w-ooror', tue' 'ok'ws 'we-rahcheen kue cheenes, weeshtue' 'o sootol'.
    Then he ran off, and the young man had a friend, and so he went to him.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  123. Tue' temaloh ko'see negeee'nowohl; kem 'o nuuem' skeleesh 'o 'ooleenehl.
    And for a long time they looked everywhere; and they came back and lay down.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  124. Tue' noo son'; tue' meykwele'wey' kue cheenes keech son' nekeelet' kue ho 'ue-ka'ar.
    So it went on; and the young man mourned its loss and came to pine for his pet.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  125. Noohl 'o pahchew kue 'yoch pa'aahl 'eekee cho sloyonekw, tue' neekee 'we-ro'onepek'.
    Then the boat moved and slid down into the water, and then sped along.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  126. Kue nuemee laakaamopeen tue' laayonekw kue 'yoch kolo neemee kaamop' 'o wee' mee' kolo worue nee raayor'.
    The boat passed through patches of very rough water as though it was quite smooth, as it seemed to move along on top of the water.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  127. Tue' neekee 'we-rooyonew kue 'yoch; wehlowaa neema kohchee seeyow' 'o puelekw, noohl 'o maayonekw kue 'yoch.
    Then the boat sped on; eleven times it broke through the waves at the mouth of the river, and then the boat went on its way.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  128. Tue' wee'eeet 'o son' 'emkee neekee 'we-ro'onepek'; wohpew neekee ro'onep'.
    So it was that it sped on; it sped on toward the west.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  129. Tue' kem Segep kem keech 'ekwehl keech mee chweenkep', mee' ho tomowo'hl tue' hlow keech 'o chkeereeshee' kue wee 'o key, tue' neemee wo hewon newom' 'w-esek' kwelekw kolo hlkehl wee'.
    Even Coyote was now afraid and did not talk, because he had been chattering and at last had felt drowsy where he was sitting, and was not the first to see that it looked like land in sight.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  130. Tue' koosee muenchey k'ee chaahl, to' kwehl na'a'mow' 'o wee'eeet noohl reeek'ew nee ko'oh kue 'we-neee'nowoyk' kue wee 'ee ko 'ue-myah kue 'yoch.
    And the sand was all white, and a crowd of people were standing on the shore to watch the boat bounding in there.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  131. Noohl 'o schep'oo; kue so schep'oo noohl 'o newee' kue hehlkue 'we-le'mek' kue 'echkwoh, kwesee wo'hl tue' weesh ho reweyetehl kue 'yoch.
    Then they landed; when they landed they saw that there were seals going ashore, and that it was they that had towed the boat.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  132. Segep poy neekee 'oo'rep', tue' keech ro'op' kue 'we-negeeen' kues soo 'oole'mow' k'ee wee nee 'oole'monee.
    Coyote went on ahead, and ran to see how people lived who lived there.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  133. Keech chpaaneek' 'ee lekwsee 'ne-'e'goolo'oh kem tue' 'eekee newochek' kue ho soo 'oolom.
    For a long time I stayed outside, and then I saw how you lived.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  134. 'Ikee newook' kue k'e-skuey' soo 'ook' tue wee'eeet mehl peerwerkseechek'.
    I saw that you were good and I loved you for it.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  135. Tue' nek wee' ko'oyuemek' kue 'echkwoh 'n-eksek', Chee nue hl'os.
    It was I who engaged the seals, saying to each of them, Go and fetch him.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  136. Tue' 'ne-let, kem 'o gesek' kwelokw kee serhkermerypewem' 'o yoh mo keemee neeege'yue' kue k'e-rahcheen; tue' wo'oot weeshtue' kee 'w-ahpew kue 'ne-let.
    I have a sister, and I thought that you would be lonely here if you did not bring your friend; and my sister may be his wife.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  137. Kwesee 'eeshkuue newom' kue wenchokws weet keech son' kue 'we-nos noohl wonue noohl nee yegokw' kem tue' kol' 'ee key.
    Then gradually the woman noticed that it happened that her husband would go far up in the hills and sit somewhere there.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  138. Keech noweenepek' yok 'no-'ook' mee' keech 'oolem' 'ne-mekey tue' neemoksue knokseemek'.
    I now like living here; I have my children and I will not leave them.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  139. Kolchee kol' 'o pegar kem tue' 'o'lep 'o myah 'w-egolek', Kuech, nee mokw' hes 'oyhl kee nepek'?
    Whenever anyone was at home he leaped into the house and said, Grandmother, isn't there anything lying here for me to eat?

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  140. Ch'uemey' keech me 'ne-skuey' soo 'ook' 'o heekoh, tue' keech knokseemek'.
    Now happily I was living across the water, and I have left it all.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  141. Tue' wee'eeet mehl heeegee' 'oohl pekwsue 'o skueyen' mocho ko'mee ha's, Keekee chue 'okw'.
    And so for this we say that it is not good if a person thinks too much, I will have everything.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  142. Na'a'lee 'o'lehl 'o Wehlkwew tue' weet 'o megetohl kue roowo's.
    There were two houses at Wehlkwew and the pipes were kept in them.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  143. Tue' wee' kue meweemor 'we-romech, wo'oot nonee pel' 'o kue 'ne-psech.
    She was the old man's niece, and was older than my father.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  144. Tue' neemok'ws 'we-nos Pewolew 'ue-Mey' soo wegenee'.
    She was unmarried and was called the Daughter of Pewolew.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  145. Negee'eeyehl tue' wee'eeet mehl hee' 'wahpemew.
    There were two of them, and so each was called the mate of the other.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  146. 'O'lehl 'o lehlkelee' tue' kerterkseenonee ha'aag weektue' 'oo'.
    Each was buried in one of the houses; there was a stone (box) with a lid inside.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  147. 'Enuemee wee' 'we-son tue' na'amee terrluel' 'o 'we-luehl mee' kee soo komchuem' 'w-esek' wee'eeet kue ho goh.
    It was just like the other, but he made two ridges round its mouth so that he should know that this was the one that he had made.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  148. Kue keech 'o nuue'monee 'woogey keet 'emehl meguehlkochehl tue' neemee weesh wo skewok wee' 'we-sook kue nek 'ne-psech.
    But after the arrival of white men the Indians began to sell them, though my father never liked that sort of thing.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  149. K'ee nuemee muueweemor 'emsee pegerey wo'hl tue' chpee weesh kee nepee'mehl, kwelekw nepuey wee chpee mehl son' kahkah ke'ween keges 'emsee kwo'ror' kwelekw k'ee kwen kee nepue'.
    Only very old men and very old women could eat salmon then; but this only concerned salmon; and sturgeon, eels, surf fish, and candlefish could be eaten all the time.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  150. Noohl Tmery 'We-Roy ho reeegor tue' wee'eeet noohl 'o gee' Pewolew.
    Waves came up as far as Cannery Creek, and this was then called Pewolew.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  151. Mocho Tmery 'We-Roy hehlkue 'o sootokw' nepuey kwelekw ko' nepue' k'ee kwen cho hehlkue no'moye'wey' tue' wee'eeet chpee nepue', kue pa'aahl 'we-tmenomen kwelekw neemee nepue'.
    If a salmon came ashore at Cannery Creek people could eat whichever part faced away from the water, and this alone was eaten, the half that was toward the water was not eaten.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  152. 'O gee' cho', Knokseemem' kue 'woogey son k'e-slekw; kolchee wohlkechee' tue' ko' 'o nerrgersem', weet kee chpee 'o nepem' kue meweemor 'we-romech 'ue-pewomek', 'ohlkuemee wok kem neeko'hl 'w-ohkepek' tue' wok kee chpee pew mehl kue nee'eeyen pegerk.
    He was told, Leave behind your white man's type of clothes; every morning you will gather sweathouse wood, and you will only eat the old man's niece's cooking, because she too was always in training and she alone cooked for the two men.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  153. Tue' kue 'ne-psech 'eemee nuemee wo tenpey' kue wee'eeet 'we-chmeyonen.
    But my father did not eat much that evening.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  154. Na'mee mechkah toomok's kue laayekw tue' mos cheetaa kol' sook kee nee 'oyhl.
    The path was two feet wide and nothing at all lay on it.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  155. Wooyhl noohl ho'op' mehl 'wo'hlp'ey' tue' weeshtue' keech nee soo swoo'melehl kue 'er'gerrch kem neekee son'.
    All night he made a fire with angelica root and so they both smelt of it and the sweathouse did as well.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  156. Noohl weeshtue' 'o gam', Kos'ela tenowonee cheeek, keekee skuey' soo hoolem' 'oohl, nerhpery tue' kee tegen' ko teno' k'ee kwen cho kee nepue', 'emsee paas teloge'mow'.
    Then he said, May there be lots of money, and the people will fare well, and may there be lots of berries and lots of all that can be eaten, and may there be no sickness among the people!

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  157. Kue woneek 'we-rohpek' kue 'wo'hlp'ey' 'ue-meraa 'o gam' kue meweemor, Kwelekw kue roowo's weesh 'we-sewepek'; kwelekw wee'eeet keekee koosee rom' tue' 'eemoksue ko teloge'mow' mehl heeko'ch'uek ho 'wes'onah.
    As the smoke from the angelica root drifted upward the old man said, This is the breath of the pipe; it will spread everywhere and there will be no sickness from here to the heavens.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  158. 'O na'an' hlom', tue' smechoy weesh 'ue-mehl hlook'.
    Then he brought two, and deerskins were what he brought.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  159. Kue meweemor negem' wohlee weyew keyom; tue' weektue' 'okw' kue 'we-roowo's 'emsee 'w-ohkuem.
    The old man took a newly made dipper basket; in it were his pipe and tobacco.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  160. Perey wee 'okw' tue wo'oot nuemee ham', Wek kee shonowom'.
    There was an old woman there and she said, This is what you will do.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  161. Merueh chee weesh serrhlerp', tue' kue kem 'w-egolek', Hl'o'ronep'es! noohl 'o ko hlom' kue ma'ah 'eekee ner'ersernem'.
    He did this five times, and when he said, Stop! he took his spear and grasped it in both hands.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  162. Kolchee tergerw kem tue' 'o goyhlkep' 'we-tuuek kolo 'we-nooloochek' kue nepuey.
    Every time he spoke its tail wagged as if the salmon were answering.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  163. Kue raayor' so Pewolew k'ee 'oohl 'eekee toom' 'w-egolehl, Kos cho 'ela tene'mehl k'ee nepuey 'ne-peeshkaahl, hehlkue tue' kee nee tenem' hoore'mos, kee tenoo cheee'sh!
    When he made his way to Pewolew the people all shouted May there be many salmon in our sea, and many animals on land, and many woodpecker scalps!

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  164. Wee' no'ok's 'yohlkoych'enee 'lahpsew nahpchueh 'o ro'oh tue' wogee 'enuemee ho'omah 'o kue 'o'lehl.
    Two wooden plates stood there, on the far side, and they had made a fire right in the middle.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  165. Tue' kue 'we-rohsek' mehl kue nepuey skelee 'o lehlkoo' kue nahko' 'enuemee wonue lekon' kue nepuey.
    When he threw it at them, the wooden plates fell down and it fell right on them.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  166. Tue' wee 'o rek'eeen wenchokws, koleen kue we'yon kue ho nergerykermeen tue' wo'oot neekee 'ue-myah 'o 'erlermerkerhl kue 'ue-kery nows 'o nek' kue nepe'weeshneg 'ue-'wers wonues 'ap nek' kue nepuey 'oyhl.
    Two women were sitting there, and one was the girl who was helping, and she jumped up and untied her hair tie, and took off the otterskin and put it on the salmon where it lay.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  167. Noohl 'o gam' kue meweemor, K'ee keech no'omuen' k'ee 'wes'onah tue' nekah keech noohl wee' segonkee'.
    The old man said, As long as the heavens have endured this ceremony has been performed by us.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  168. 'O gam' kue meweemor, K'ee kwen cho' keech noohl reeegohsonee nepuey tue' chpee kor' 'oohl neekee markuem' kue nahche'leesh kee 'we-nepek' k'ee nepuey.
    The old man said, All the time that salmon have been speared, only one man has eaten all the salmon he was given to eat.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  169. Weeshtue' weesh soo wa'sok 'w-esek' kwesee weet ho soo hoolem' 'oohl tue' kwelas keech ho noo weeshtue' ko hohkuem'.
    And so he was full of pity that this was how they the people had lived and now he himself had taken part.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  170. 'O gam' kue 'ne-psech, Kue keech no'ohl ho nepoh kue nepuey tue' 'o cherperhl soneenepek'; keneemee cheeweyek' 'eemee che'looksek'.
    My father said, Since I ate the salmon I feel strong from it; I am not hungry and I am not thirsty.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  171. 'O wooyhl noohl he'woneehlehl tue' 'o tegeruem' 'ue-mes kue meweemor; noohl 'o huemerhl.
    They were awake all night, and the old man made his medicine; then they sweated.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  172. Tue' kneweteek' kem 'o ko choomo'ol' noohl 'esee kemey' so Rek'woy.
    He stayed nine days before going home to Requa.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  173. Noohl weeshtue' kem 'ap 'o nerrger's tue' 'o kohtoh hegor noohl weeshtue' son' 'w-ohkepek'.
    Then he gathered sweathouse wood and kept himself in training for one month more.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  174. Tue' we'yon weesh ho tekwtekwsom', noohl puelekws kue laaregor 'ema ho swoyhlkweyet'.
    The girl cut this up and scattered it at the mouth of the river where the waves break along the shore.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  175. 'Imee wo pelep' mehl wee' tue' 'enuemee ho tenem' nepuey 'o weet 'o no'ohl.
    There was no fighting over it, and salmon was very plentiful that season.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  176. Tue' weeshtue' 'o soo gohkuem' 'ue-meloo kue 'ne-peychew Wo'onor:
    That's how my deceased grandfather Wo'onor made his brush dance song:

    — Lowana Brantner, Wohpekumew's Prediction (LA16-9, 1951)

  177. Nek no'p'enek' meweehl tue' tepoonohl 'o ro'op'.
    I was chasing an elk but it ran into the forest.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  178. Tue' 'w-ooror'.
    Then he ran off.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  179. Tue' regor kue 'ue-plerwerneryk'.
    The waves were running up making it high water.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  180. Heekon nuemee keem soo yewo'hl tue' 'o tenem' markwewohl.
    Years ago there was a terrible earthquake and many people perished.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  181. Tosoh wa'soy' tue' 'o skueyen' kue pegerk.
    Though he is poor the man is good for all that.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  182. Kaamege'hl tue' hes 'ee yesem', Kee hegok'?
    The weather is bad, do you still think, I will go?

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  183. Tema hloy kee 'ne-kweget tue' yo'hlkoh 'ee nuuem'.
    I tried to visit you but they arrived at the time.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  184. Tue' mehl chegeyken' 'ne-cheeeshep'.
    That is why my flowers are small.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  185. Hegoyek' tue' neekee hegok'.
    I was told and so I went.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  186. Hegoyek' tue' 'eekee hegok'.
    I was told and went at once.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  187. Tosoh nergery wee' 'we-serrhlerh tue' 'eemee wee' pyekchoh.
    Though I helped him do it I did not approve of it.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  188. Keech ho'omoh tue' neemoksue nohtenehl 'w-oole'mehl.
    They are hurt and cannot walk at all.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  189. Tue' kneweteek' 'o ko choomo'ol'.
    He was away nine days there.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  190. Tue' sega'anee poy 'o chee nue raayor'.
    And frequently it ran right on ahead.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  191. Tue' weet 'ee mehl 'w-ew wey' tege'muer.
    That is why its name is snowbird.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  192. Tue' neemee weesh wo skewok wee 'we-sook.
    But he did not like that sort of thing.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  193. Tue' nek 'ne-psech 'eemee nuemee wo tenpey'.
    But my father did not eat very much.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  194. Chmeyaan see nes tue' 'eemee wo nes tue' nekah kelomek 'n-ew.
    He should have come yesterday, but he did not come, and we were worried.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  195. Temaloh negeeen' kue kel' k'e-rahcheen tue' 'eemee wo gekwsesoh.
    We looked for your friend a long time, but we did not find him.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  196. Tue' 'eemee 'uema koh.
    But we did not catch anything.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  197. Nek no'p'enek' meweehl tue' tepoonohl 'we-heenoy 'o ro'op'.
    I was chasing an elk but it ran behind the trees.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  198. Kues tue' kue ch'eeshah?
    Where then are the dogs?

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  199. Nek kwelekw ma hasek' kue kepoyuerek' tue' neemoksue megelok' ho kelew.
    I have decided to go swimming and shall not come with you.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  200. Kaamege'hl tue' hes 'ee yesem' kee yegok'?
    The weather is bad; do you still intend to go?

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  201. Keech ho'omoh tue' neemoksue nohten' 'w-egok'.
    He is hurt and cannot walk.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  202. K'ee kwen cho nue sootoom' kem tue' nee tenoo 'errwerh.
    Wherever you go there is a lot of grass.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  203. Tosoh nergery wee' 'we-serrhlerh tue' 'eemee wee' pyekchoh.
    Although I helped him do it I did not approve.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  204. Kolchee newohpen' tue' kem neekee 'wr-'er'gerp.
    Every time he sees me he tells me of it.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  205. Kolchee wohlkechee' tue' ko 'o nerrgersem'.
    Every (time it is) morning you will gather sweathouse wood.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  206. Kues tue' ha'aag?
    Where is the rock?

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  207. Hahl tue' kue neee'nowos'o'.
    Let me go and tell them.

    — Mary Marshall, Coyote and Crane (MM3, 1927)

  208. Keet tue' newor.
    Now it dawned.

    — Mary Marshall, Medicine formula to get wealthy (MM5, 1927)

  209. Puelekuek 'w-rpkeryko nee mehl hopkechol'. Tue' weeshtue' me'womechol'.
    He began downriver from where the river starts. That's where he came from.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  210. Tue' 'o nuemeechyue hek'ws: leyolekws, hlmeyep'eer', hlkerrwers, hlkerrwers, hlkwerterkws .
    He found everything: gartersnakes, rattlesnakes, salamanders, salamanders, frogs.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  211. Toomeneek k'ee nue segonowonee tue' nep'.
    He ate all the kinds of things that existed.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  212. Neekeechyue sook tue' nep', 'emsee k'ee huuek hlkeyuer.
    He ate every kind of thing, even the slimy babies.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  213. Tue' kolo new' wohpue 'ee nee looleek k'ee wer'ergeryerwernee wenchokws 'ue-meyoomoyk'.
    He could see them thrown in the water by pregnant young women.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  214. Tue' noo laay', wek tue' noo laay' so pech.
    He kept going along, he kept going upriver.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  215. Tue' noo laay', tue' pechkues 'o ho neskwechokw' nee soneenee.
    He kept going along, he arrived upriver doing so.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  216. K'ee mer'wermery tue' nee soneenee weeshtue' son' nuemeechyue nep'.
    Doing so where the river comes from he ate everything.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  217. K'ee chegee new 'we-segonowonee, k'ee chegee new 'we-sook, k'ee kwen cho' nee newo'meesh, tue' nee nep'.
    Everything he saw of all descriptions, every kind of thing he saw, whatever he saw, he ate it.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  218. Peesh, kwesee 'o loksee'hl, kwesee 'eeshkuue 'ee weeshtue' son', keech tue' weeshtue' ho soo gegol'. 'Ishkuue nee slo'ehlko'.
    Well, then it was a year, and slowly it was like this, since he had gone around like that. Slowly he wasted away.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  219. Te nue chyue soneenee ye's k'ee skuey' soneenah, kem tue' neemee hlom' k'ee 'we-skuey' soneenah.
    He tried to do everything he thought of to make himself feel better, but he didn't take what would make him feel better.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  220. K'i nuemeechyue sook k'e-negepek', k'ee 'oohl kol' wee' sonowoom' tue' nepem'.
    You eat every kind of thing, you even eat people who are dead.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  221. K'i chegee nue 'wo-sook hlmeyep'eer' tue' nepem'. Tue' weet keech k'e-me'womechkok'.
    You eat every kind of thing, even rattlesnakes. That is what you have become sick from.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  222. Keyomohl cho' ket'ohpeenem'. Cho' s'emem', tue' weet ko 'o so tegeruepaanem'.
    Cook (me) in a basket dipper. Pound me up, then you will talk to me.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  223. Kwelekw weet kee mehl hewolochem', mo wee'eeet tue' mehl slo'ehlkoom', keech mehl mokw' k'e-tewon. Wek hehl neee'nes k'e-'wes!
    You will get well from that, for you are thin, you no longer have flesh. Look at yourself!

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  224. 'O neee'now' 'ue-'wes. Neesh! Tue' kome neskweyowok'.
    He looked at himself. Alas! He was sick.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  225. Tue k'ee sonenee, k'ee sonenee menomenehl tue' sonenee tema tektoy', kem tue neemee wo' pyekwchenee serneryerh kee 'we-tektonek'.
    Like a cliff it was to stand there, but it did not look right as it stood there.

    — Captain Spott, "The Obsidian Cliff at Rek'woy" (X16, 1907)

  226. Tue' weetue sonenee mehl newee'.
    That is how it looked.

    — Captain Spott, "The Obsidian Cliff at Rek'woy" (X16, 1907)

  227. Tue' weetue... tue weetue see segoo hohkue'.
    Thus, thus they would have regularly made (them).

    — Captain Spott, "The Obsidian Cliff at Rek'woy" (X16, 1907)

  228. 'W-esek', Chuehl, Tue' weetue kee... nohsuenowok'.
    (She is) thinking, Yes, that's where I'll live.

    — Captain Spott, Myth of Rock (Once a Woman) (Xd, 1907)

  229. Tue' keekee soo neenee... keekee soo neenee skuue... Weetee mehl wo nue skuuewok...
    ... they are good ... That is why they like them.

    — Captain Spott, Myth of Rock (Once a Woman) (Xd, 1907)

  230. Tue' weetue' 'n-ewolek' Chahpcheeek.
    My name is Chahpchiik.

    — Captain Spott, Myth of Rock (Once a Woman) (Xd, 1907)

  231. Tue' weetee' mehl 'n-ewolek' Chahpcheeek.
    That is why I am called Chahpchiik.

    — Captain Spott, Myth of Rock (Once a Woman) (Xd, 1907)

  232. Tue' wokhlee, tue' wee' nek sonowok', tue' wee'eeet mehl hekchek'.
    I am glad, that's why I did that, that's why I spoke to you.

    — Lame Billy, Gambling medicine formula (Ac, 1902)

  233. Tue' 'o'lepeek keekee 'ooluuekwseyhl k'ee cheeekcheeek.
    and money will be in the house

    — Susie of Wechpus, Menstruation medicine (recorded) (SW2, 1902)