Yurok dictionary

Writing system: default | hyphens | linguistic

Search index (1)

weet

Dictionary entry

weetpron • this, that, these, those, thus

Lexicon record # 3895 | Source reference: R263

Special meaning or use

  • Keech weet son' It became, It came to be JE17

Sentence examples (200)

  1. Tue' weet 'o pkwekoyo' yo'.
    It (water) comes out of the ground there.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Glenn Moore, Sentences (AG-10) (AG-10, 2008)

  2. 'Ne-ykew wohpuek 'o lekon', pa'aahl 'o lekon'. Kwesee weet 'o soo ho wey' keen.
    My brother drowned in the river when he was fishing.

    Audio
    | Download

    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  3. Tue' weet mehl tewomehlkok' kee 'ne-laayolahkee 'ne-saa'agochek'.
    I'm glad you're teaching me how to speak Yurok.

    Audio
    | Download

    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  4. Wonue so nuer'uern, regoh 'o tep tue' weet 'o key.
    He climbed up and he is sitting in the tree.

    Audio
    | Download

    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  5. Kue k'ooy' wee' weet 'o go key kue 'erplers 'o teponee.
    The bluejay is sitting in the apple tree.

    Audio
    | Download

    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  6. Sa'anee weet soo pel' soo tenpewe'hl keemee neworkwek' kue wee' 'ne-laayek'.
    Sometimes it rains so hard I can't see where I'm going.

    Audio
    | Download

    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  7. 'Owook weet kol' kue 'o nepek' kue 'ne-kuechos 'ol'.
    I'm going to eat at my grandmother's house tomorrow.

    Audio
    | Download

    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  8. Tue weet hoolen'... kue 'we-kuechos hegoh 'o... kue 'we-skery, 'we-skery ho hool.
    She is wearing the dress her grandmother made.

    Audio
    | Download

    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  9. We'yk'oh 'ochkaa holeem' cheykenee 'we-no'os. Keetee 'o huuek... weet holeem'.
    Right now she's making a baby basket for her baby ...

    Audio
    | Download

    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  10. Kue we'yon 'ochkaa mehl wey' weet 'we-soosek' kwen mewah kee 'we-nee'eehl.
    The girl is thinking about which boy she will go with.

    Audio
    | Download

    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  11. 'Owook kee kem weet mehl toh kee 'ne-saa'agoche'moh.
    We'll talk Yurok again tomorrow.

    Audio
    | Download

    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  12. Weet 'o chyuuek'wen' perrgeesh pa'aahl 'o neee'now', 'o newohl nepuey... weet 'o soo kohchewohl.
    The eagle is sitting there looking at the water, they see salmon ... that's how they catch them.

    Audio
    | Download

    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  13. Nek 'o skueyenee 'o tmeeegok' weet segootok'.
    I go hunting where I know it's safe.

    Audio
    | Download

    — Georgiana Trull, Sentences (LC-01-2) (LC-01-2, 2007)

  14. Wee' chpee mehl pel' soo hlmeyowok', kue 'ne-sonkopa'. Tue weet pel' soo hlmeyowok'.
    That's why I'm mean, because of what you did to me. That's why I'm mean.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Jimmie James, Sentences (AG-07-1) (AG-07-1, 2006)

  15. Tue weet 'ne-sonoyopa', ho weet 'ne-sonkopa'.
    You treated me like that.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Jimmie James, Sentences (AG-07-1) (AG-07-1, 2006)

  16. Tue weet 'ne-sonkopa'. Tue' kolnee kee hoo'yk'... kolnee kee mo ko 'ne-t'p'ohlkwek'.
    That's how you treated me. I'm going to lose I'm kind of going to lose my senses.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Jimmie James, Sentences (AG-07-1) (AG-07-1, 2006)

  17. 'O meguehl ma nee hegok' 'o ma newok' weet 'o goolem'.
    When I went to the store, I saw they were there.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Jimmie James, Elicited Sentences About Repeated Events (EJW-01-1-1, 2006)

  18. Kue meguehl ma nee 'n-egok''o ma new weet 'o goolem'.
    When I went to the store, I saw they were there.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Jimmie James, Elicited Sentences About Repeated Events (EJW-01-1-1, 2006)

  19. 'O meguehl ma nee hegok' 'o ma new weet 'o goolem' kue 'ne-too'mar.
    When I went to the store, I saw my friends were there too.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Jimmie James, Elicited Sentences About Repeated Events (EJW-01-1-1, 2006)

  20. Weet sooneehlkwook'.
    This is what I dreamed.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Aileen Figueroa, Elicited Questions and Related Sentences (JB-17-1, 2005)

  21. Wek neehl weet sooneehlkwook'.
    This is what I dreamed.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Aileen Figueroa, Elicited Questions and Related Sentences (JB-17-1, 2005)

  22. Weet sooneehlem'.
    That's what you dreamed.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Aileen Figueroa, Elicited Questions and Related Sentences (JB-17-1, 2005)

  23. Weet sooneehlek'.
    This is what I dreamed.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Aileen Figueroa, Elicited Questions and Related Sentences (JB-17-1, 2005)

  24. 'Okw' 'we-reweeesh weet nee 'oolem' kwegeruer'.
    Pigs live where they have a fence.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Aileen Figueroa, Elicited Sentences About Animals (AG-01-2, 2004)

  25. Weet nee 'oolem' kue kwegeruer'.
    Pigs live there.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Aileen Figueroa, Elicited Sentences About Animals (AG-01-2, 2004)

  26. Mos weet segon'.
    That's not the way to do it.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Glenn Moore, Discussion and sentences related to a Coyote story (GM4, 2004)

  27. Weet kee ko tmegook'.
    Then I'll hunt.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Glenn Moore, Discussion of hunting language and directional terminology (GM9, 2004)

  28. Weet kee laayek'.
    I'm going that way.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Glenn Moore, Discussion of hunting language and directional terminology (GM9, 2004)

  29. Weet choolekw ko so tmegook'.
    I'm going to hunt down the hill.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Glenn Moore, Discussion of hunting language and directional terminology (GM9, 2004)

  30. Weet ko pkwechook'.
    That's where I'm going to come out.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Glenn Moore, Discussion of hunting language and directional terminology (GM9, 2004)

  31. Weet 'o tepon' s'e'goh.
    There's a madrone tree growing there.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Glenn Moore, Discussion of hunting language and directional terminology (GM9, 2004)

  32. Weet wonue chee 'o sooto'.
    You go up the hill right there.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Glenn Moore, Discussion of hunting language and directional terminology (GM9, 2004)

  33. Weet 'o tmohkelee', ko neeen' 'o wonekw,'o tmohkelee' nahkwoh tepoo.
    It's broken there, look uphill, there's a broken fir there.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Glenn Moore, Discussion of hunting language and directional terminology (GM9, 2004)

  34. Kue pueleek weet soonekw weet cho' laas so hegoom'.
    You go on the path that goes downriver.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Glenn Moore, Discussion of hunting language and directional terminology (GM9, 2004)

  35. Weet 'ap telohpekw kue laas.
    There's a fork in the trail.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Glenn Moore, Discussion of trails and trail directions (GM8, 2003)

  36. Weet ho telohpekw kue laas.
    There was a fork in the trail.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Glenn Moore, Discussion of trails and trail directions (GM8, 2003)

  37. Kwesee kue Segep 'o hem', Mos weet segon', kuech.
    And Coyote said, That's not how you do it, grandmother.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Glenn Moore, Coyote and His Grandmother (GM11, 2002)

  38. Weet nee 'oyhl kue leyes.
    The snake is lying there.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Aileen Figueroa, Elicited Sentences (JB-04-1a) (JB-04-1a, 2002)

  39. Weet 'o chyeguuekwenek'.
    This is my sitting place; I sit here all the time.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Glenn Moore, Sentences (JB-03-1) (JB-03-1, 2002)

  40. Weet 'o hegokw' kue puuek.
    The deer walked there.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Aileen Figueroa, Sentences (JB-05-1a) (JB-05-1a, 2002)

  41. Kol' 'we-no'ohl weet ho 'okw' 'woogey.
    A long time ago there was a white guy (who used to stay with us).

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Aileen Figueroa, Eating Fish Heads (AF3, 2001)

  42. Weet 'ema koko'yopah.
    Someone was showing off.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-003) (LA138-003, 1980)

  43. Weet 'o kwetoyoks.
    It's sticking out like that.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-006) (LA138-006, 1980)

  44. Nek weet lehlkenek'.
    I threw them (scattered them).

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-008) (LA138-008, 1980)

  45. Mos keech newok' weet 'we-soo kaamopek'.
    I've never seen such rough water.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-015) (LA138-015, 1980)

  46. Nek weet soneenepek' kee 'n-egok'.
    I think I will go.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-017) (LA138-017, 1980)

  47. Neekee kue wek 'o too'moh weet ma laayo'omah.
    We all ran by this place.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-017) (LA138-017, 1980)

  48. Weet kee mehl tektekoh.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-022) (LA138-022, 1980)

  49. Saa'agochek', weet wo'nee serrhlerpek'.
    I speak the native language, that's what I'm doing now.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-035) (LA138-035, 1980)

  50. Lekwseek 'o koo'op'es weet ko saawokseemem'.
    Stand outside and you'll cool down.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-036) (LA138-036, 1980)

  51. Tenpeyok' wo neemee 'we-ske'wonee, tue weet mehl telek'.
    I ate too much of something that wasn't done, and it made me sick.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-040) (LA138-040, 1980)

  52. Nek kem 'orogok', weet 'orogok'.
    I also walked with them, I walked with them.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-046) (LA138-046, 1980)

  53. Weet 'o tek ha'aag.
    There's a rock sitting there.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-052) (LA138-052, 1980)

  54. Weet 'o tek tekwonekws.
    There's a box sitting there.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-052) (LA138-052, 1980)

  55. Cho' nue tohpekw weet kee raayor' kue pa'ah.
    Go dig a hole where the water runs past.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-053) (LA138-053, 1980)

  56. Weet 'ee kwegomhlem'.
    They're walking back and forth there.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-055) (LA138-055, 1980)

  57. Cho' mer'errnem' mee' weet kee neeege'yow'.
    Catch up with him because you two are going together.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-058) (LA138-058, 1980)

  58. Weet laakekelomenekw'.
    They're swirling around (along) on the water.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-058) (LA138-058, 1980)

  59. Weet ma laayek'.
    I walked.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-058) (LA138-058, 1980)

  60. [Kus soo cheeeshep' yok nee huenem'?] Nuemeechue son' cheeeshep', mee' kue weykonee wee'. Wohpekuemew meesh koh weykom', neekeechue soo kue cheeeshep'. 'ue-meskem nuemee soochokw'. Nuemeechue soo kaap' huuenekw', mee' weeshtue' 'ue-meskwoh. Mos 'okw' meges, neemo 'okw' ho meges. 'Oohl naa megeskew'. Weet mehl ho huuenem' Wohpekuemew 'ue-mes. Weeshtue' 'eeyoh 'ue-mes.
    [What kinds of flowers are around here?] There are all kinds of flowers, because the creator finished all of that. Wohpekumew had finished them, all different kinds of flowers. Medicine is the same way. There are all kinds of plants, because that's his medicine. There was no [white] doctor. They didn't have doctors then. They had Indian doctors. That is why they grew, as Wohpekumew's medicine. He just picked his medicine anyplace].

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  61. [Kus soo tepoo yok nee huenem'?] Weet kem skuueyenee tepoo, weet tue' 'o hohkue' k'ee yok nee tepoo. Pechue nee tepoo kem skuueyen'.
    [What kinds of trees are around here?] Tepoo is good, you can pick tepoo around here. Upriver tepoo is good also.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  62. [Kus soo meskwoh yok nee huenem'?] Teno' son' meskwoh 'o yoh. 'Ohlkuemee' ko weykonee' weet kee shon'.
    [What kinds of medicines are around here?] Lots of kinds of medicine here. It had been finished so it could be like that.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  63. [Nunepuy hes wee' k'ee pee'eeyers?] 'Ee, weet kem negepue' k'ee pee'eeyers nee pechueh. Kee rorowenee' keech 'o nepue'.
    [Is the freshwater clam a nunepuy?] Yes, they eat freshwater clams upriver. You have to gather them and then eat them.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  64. [Nunepuy hes wee' k'ee hlkerrwers?] Paa', weet kwel neemee negepue' k'ee hlkerrwers.
    [Is the lizard a nunepuy?] No, they don't eat the waterdog.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  65. [Hoore'mos hes wee' k'ee neekwech?] 'Ee, 'o hlmeyowonee wee'. Chuelue mos ho legey' 'oohl. Weet ho 'oolem' weet soo. Tue' neemee wee hoolegey' 'oohl keech 'o merkue' mocho keechee' laay 'oohl. Se'nee kwel neemee wo nep'. Mo newom' 'oohl 'eekee 'ee, 'ohlkuemee tergerwermee' mehl kee'ee. 'Okw' soo tergerw' neekwech.
    [Is the grizzly bear a hoore'mos?] Yes, he's mean. A person couldn't go through Bald Hills. They used to live there. A person couldn't go through, he'd get eaten up, if a person goes through there. Sometimes he wouldn't eat you, when he sees a person he'll run away, they talk to him and scare him away. There is a way to speak to a grizzly.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  66. [Hoore'mos hes wee' k'ee leyes?] Leyes, 'ee, weet kem hoore'mos, k'ee leyes. Maageen hlmeyowom'.
    [Is the snake a hoore'mos?] Snake, yes, snake is an animal too, snake. Some are mean.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  67. [Hoore'mos hes wee' k'ee 'eskew?] Weet kem kegahseluem' 'oohl k'ee 'eskew.
    [Is the turtle a hoore'mos?] Turtle is also a stranger to people.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  68. [Hoore'mos hes wee' k'ee lochom'?] 'Ee, weet tue' kem kee hlmeykom' mocho kee yo hoolenah keehl meykoyem'.
    [Is the toad a hoore'mos?] Yes, that can harm you also if you disturb them, they can hurt you.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  69. [Leyes hes wee' k'ee 'eskew?] Paa, weet kem woogeen k'ee 'eskew.
    [Is the turtle a leyes?] No, turtle is different.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  70. [Leyes hes wee' k'ee 'yekwhl?] Paa', wot kem neemee leyes. Chohpos weesh we-nohl weet 'o hewolon.
    [Is the maggot a leyes?] no, that's not a snake. They're fly's excrement, they come al..

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  71. [Leyes hes wee' k'ee merwerseeshleg?] Paa', weet kem neemee leyes wee'.
    [Is the biting lizard a leyes?] No, that's not a snake.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  72. [Ch'uch'ish hes wee' k'ee kelok?] Kelok weet kem woogeen... Kegahselom' 'oohl kelok. 'esee puelekuek' soo kemey'. 'ue-psech puelekuek sootokw'...
    [Is the goose a ch'uch'ish?] Goose is different. Goose is a stranger to people. It goes north to its home. Its father was from the north.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  73. [Ch'uch'ish hes wee' k'ee k'yow?] Paa', weet kem woogeen k'ee k'yow.
    [Is the swan a ch'uch'ish?] No, swan is different.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  74. [Ch'uch'ish hes wee' k'ee mueerrn?] Weet kem mueerrn nepueyeesh speeego'ronew, een the spreeng. 'O lee', Kem newopaa' keechow 'oow 'erkeryernerw. 'O lee', 'eee, mueerrn. Kem newochek' keech keew 'o hegom'.
    [Is the river duck a ch'uch'ish?] It's different, he has a race with salmon, in the spring. He says, "You will see me, I'll be there waiting (floating) in a pool", the loon said. "I will see you when you are there."

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  75. [Kaap'ehl hes wee' k'ee wer'nerr?] Wr'nerr weet kem hegohkue'. Mee neemee kee 'ahspem' mocho kee ko'soh hewechem' wer'nerr 'ee nepem' k'e-rekwoh mee pa'ah. Pa'ah 'okw' wer'nerr. Keechoh hewechem' kue k'e-che'look.
    [Is the horsetail a kaap'ehl?] They gather horsetails. When you can't drink water if you want to live "high" you eat horsetails, it's like drinking water. Horsetails have water. You get over your thirst.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  76. [Kaap'ehl hes wee' k'ee tegetor'?] 'Ee, weet kem negepue' tegetor'.
    [Is the salmonberry shoot a kaap'ehl?] Yes, tegeto'r is also eaten.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  77. [Kaap'ehl hes wee' k'ee hega'p'oh?] 'Ee, hega'p'oh weet kem. Weet kem skueyenee wee' k'ee hega'p'oh. Newom' muenchey 'ue-'wer', skueyenee.
    [Is the cottonwood a kaap'ehl?] Yes, cottonwood too, cottonwood is good. You see its white roots, they're good.

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Alice Spott, Ethnobiology (AS1, 1962 or 1963)

  78. Weet hes nee teloge'mow' kue kel' noo hegoolom?
    Were they sick where you've been?

    Audio
    | Download | Password required

    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (RHR) (RHR, 1951)

  79. Tekwe's kohchee weet son' kue '-uueksoh keech tegahtok.
    Once the owl acted in such a way that his children were starving.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Robert Spott's "The Owl" (GM1, 2004)

  80. Kwesee noohl pontet 'o hlee', noohl weet 'we-luehl neenee muelonee weet.
    Then they took ashes, and they rubbed them on their mouths there.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Robert Spott's "The Owl" (GM1, 2004)

  81. Tue' weet 'ee mehl 'w-ew kue Tege'muer tue' weeshtue' nee shoo nohsuenowohl.
    And that is why their name is Snowbird, and so they grow like that.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Robert Spott's "The Owl" (GM1, 2004)

  82. Tue' weet mehl 'w-ew wey' kue Tege'muer tue' weeshtue' nee shoo nohsuenowohl.
    And that is why their name is Snowbird, and so they grow like that.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Robert Spott's "The Owl" (GM1, 2004)

  83. Tue' weet too' 'we-tekwe's 'we-'er'gerp.
    And thus ends the story of the owl.

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Robert Spott's "The Owl" (GM1, 2004)

  84. Kwesee keech 'ela wey 'we-chuerp'ery kue negeneech, noohl weet 'ela myah noohl 'ap hem', Kues cho soo newoyek'? To's keech mermeryerwerk'?
    After the mouse got through combing, he jumped in front of the frog, and said, How do I look? Am I pretty now?

    — Glenn Moore, Retelling of Florence Shaughnessy's "The Toad and The Mouse" (GM3, 2004)

  85. Tue weet 'ue-soo nohlpeyk'.
    So he shits like that.

    — Georgiana Trull, Bear and Hummingbird (GT1, 2003)

  86. Tue weet tue we'yk'oh, mocho kee newom' cher'ery kol 'em nohlpey', kolnee 'o pa'aamee' mee kue chegemem 'ue-meskwok'.
    So today, if you see a bear went to the bathroom, it looks kind of wet because the Hummingbird treated him.

    — Georgiana Trull, Bear and Hummingbird (GT1, 2003)

  87. Mocho keech high tide, 'yohlkoych' che'woreesh hehlkue 'o lechkenekw, tue' weet 'ela hegoh 'ne-'yoh.
    When it was high tide, wood drifted up on shore, and we would gather our wood.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Otters" (LA181-2, 1986)

  88. Kwesee keech tyohpeyoksee' weet 'o 'w-egoo mee' hesehl, Nek soo keetee keemkee' kue '-uueksoh.
    They dislike going around there because they think, Maybe their children will be injured.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Otters" (LA181-2, 1986)

  89. Tue' wee'eeet 'o ro'opek' nek weet 'ema kol' kegohtoh (?) kue otter, 'o ko hlook' kue 'ne-ch'eesh.
    And I ran there, ..., I grabbed my dog.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Otters" (LA181-2, 1986)

  90. And cheeeshep' tue' huenem' nee wee', tue' weet kem 'o hoh.
    And flowers grew around there, and we gathered them too.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Otters" (LA181-2, 1986)

  91. To' wee' chpee shoo kom, 'esee kwelekw weet 'ela tenem'.
    That's all I know about that, there were a lot of them.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Otters" (LA181-2, 1986)

  92. ... Papa 'o gem', ... Kohpey ... kee shootok' ... weet 'oolem' meges.
    Papa said, I'm going to the hills ... Doctors live there.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  93. Kue weet kol' ... nepee'moh.
    We ate something.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  94. Tue' weet 'o kol' tekwsom'.
    He cut something.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  95. Tue' weet heenoy ... 'o letkweloyhl.
    They were dragged behind.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  96. Tue' weet 'o soo keskee so keromoh ... 'ohlkuemee wo'oohl ... kue keromoh.
    That's how the car got downhill, because the car ... with it.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  97. Kwesee weet 'ap 'o 'e'goo' kue wee'eeet 'oole'monee 'oohl.
    And the people who lived there were there.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  98. Tue' weet 'ema hlo 'ohpew merwperh.
    Then he was given food.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  99. Noohl kue muelah hoole'monee weet 'em 'o noo.
    Then the horses ... there.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  100. Tue' weet kem 'o k'enego'ohl keech 'oolo'oh kue muelah kue wonue kem 'o le'moh.
    The horses ... were often standing.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  101. Kwesee kue nek 'oolo' nuemee 'we- heechoy weet 'ap 'o mekwehl pa'aahl.
    And right below where I lived, it got piled up in the water there.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Klamath Bridge" (LA181-10, 1986)

  102. Kem 'ee yem' 'o'rowee', To' kee kem ko hookwchek'; mocho kem kee 'ap newok' keech 'ue-markewechek', kem kee weet 'o sonowok'.
    The dove said, I will gamble again; and if I find him already dead when I come, this is what I will do.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Mourning Dove" (LA16-1, 1951)

  103. Peesh weeshtue' chpeyuer' Tewpos 'o cheen, 'w-egolek', Weet sonowok' 'ne-skewokseemek' kue Pekwtuehl 'o we'yon.
    So this is the story of the young man from Tewpos, how he said, It has happened to me that I love the girl at Pekwtuhl.

    — Bessie Fleischman, "The Story of the Klamath River Song" (LA16-2, 1951)

  104. Soo 'o legeyk', Paas, mee' nekah kwelekw weet ho soo weykee' Wohpekuemew:
    But I was told, No, because Wohpekumew has so commanded us:

    — Bessie Fleischman, "The Story of the Klamath River Song" (LA16-2, 1951)

  105. Won soo tohkow; mos weet kee skueyen' kee k'e-'wegahpemew.
    They talk a different language; it would not be good for you to marry with them.

    — Bessie Fleischman, "The Story of the Klamath River Song" (LA16-2, 1951)

  106. Tue' weet 'ee mehl 'o son' kee ho 'w-oole'mow' heekon, mos kol' kee nee nosep'.
    And that is why people lived like that in former times, and nobody could marry into a family in the west.

    — Bessie Fleischman, "The Story of the Klamath River Song" (LA16-2, 1951)

  107. Kwesee weet 'o lee' kue Tewpos 'o cheen, Neemee wo hlee' kue k'e-we'yonesek'.
    And so the young man from Tewpos was told, Your offer of a bride price has not been accepted.

    — Bessie Fleischman, "The Story of the Klamath River Song" (LA16-2, 1951)

  108. Cho' weet 'o kwomhlechom', kowecho ko kwermhleryerhserrm' k'ee kee shoo hegoolom.
    Go back home, and do not turn around while you are traveling.

    — Bessie Fleischman, "The Story of the Klamath River Song" (LA16-2, 1951)

  109. 'O gem', Paa, mos nek weet kee nepek' mee' neemuech 'okw' 'nr-merw.
    He said, No, I will not eat it as I have my own food with me.

    — Lowana Brantner, "Wohpekumew and the Salmon" (LA16-3, 1951)

  110. Tue' weet 'ee mehl son' we'yk'oh k'ee 'we-roy 'ue-kerkue'yermery teytko'hl mee' keech 'o komchuem' 'w-esek' heenoy keech 'o gegokw'.
    That is how it came about that today the bends in the river are sharp because he knew that (the daughter of the head of the river) was coming after him.

    — Lowana Brantner, "Wohpekumew and the Salmon" (LA16-3, 1951)

  111. Tekwe's kohchee weet son' kue '-uueksoh keech tegahtok.
    Once the owl acted in such a way that his children were starving.

    — Robert Spott, "The Owl" (LA16-4, 1951)

  112. Kwesee noohl pontet 'o hlee', noohl weet 'we-luelohl 'enee muelonee' wee'eeet.
    Then they took ashes, and they rubbed them on their mouths there.

    — Robert Spott, "The Owl" (LA16-4, 1951)

  113. Tue' weet 'ee mehl 'w-ew wey' kue Tege'muer tue' weeshtue' nee shoo nohsuenowohl.
    And that is why their name is Snowbird, and so they grow like that.

    — Robert Spott, "The Owl" (LA16-4, 1951)

  114. Tue' weet too' 'we-tekwe's 'we-'er'gerp.
    And thus ends the story of the owl.

    — Robert Spott, "The Owl" (LA16-4, 1951)

  115. Kwesee keech 'ela wey 'we-chuerp'ery kue negeneech, noohl weet 'ela myah noohl 'ap ham', Kues cho soo newoyek'? Ney, to's keech mermeryerwerk'?
    And when the mouse had finished combing her hair, she jumped up and said, How do I look? My dear, am I pretty now?

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Toad and the Mouse" (LA16-6, 1951)

  116. K'ehl nuemee tom' kue mewah, kwesee keet 'o pel' weet 'o son' keskee chpee nee yegokw' mos wey 'ue-kertkerk'.
    The boy was very small, but as he began to grow up it turned out that all he would do was to go down to the water's edge and was never done with fishing for trout.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  117. 'Emkee keech 'o nuemee pel' keech 'o cheenomewes, tue' weet son' chpee 'we-tmeeegok'.
    Then he quite grew up and became a young man, and it turned out that all he did was to hunt.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  118. Kwesee weet keech 'o son' keech 'o gooro'rep' kue 'ue-ka'ar.
    And it turned out that his pet ran around there.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  119. Kem weet 'ela myah Segep kem 'ap new kwesee hasee puer noohl keech weno'monekw weno'omor' kue 'yoch.
    And in this way Coyote jumped along and saw the boat floating down and moving toward the mouth of the river.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  120. Kwesee kue weet 'owook kechoyk 'o newee' kolo 'ee newee' 'w-eseyek' kwelekw kol' sook poy 'ue-weno'omuerehl.
    The next morning they looked and fancied they saw some things swimming ahead of them.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  121. Noohl kues kee shoo mee' kolonee kahselopehl, kues k'ee kwenee ho wee' nuue'mehl, mee' koosee muenchey k'ee chaahl, mos wee nuuewee' weet 'we-soo ko 'oole'mow'.
    Then how could they feel strange, (wondering) where on earth they had come to at this place, for the sand was all white, and they had never seen people living like this.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  122. Noohl weeshtue' 'o soo's 'w-esek', Kwesee we'yon wee' kue ho 'ne-ka'ar, kwesee weet 'ee mehl ko'mee ho soo nooluemek'.
    And then he thought, So this girl is my former pet, and that is why I loved her so much.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  123. Kwesee 'eeshkuue newom' kue wenchokws weet keech son' kue 'we-nos noohl wonue noohl nee yegokw' kem tue' kol' 'ee key.
    Then gradually the woman noticed that it happened that her husband would go far up in the hills and sit somewhere there.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  124. Kue wee' hegohkuemeen kwelekw Charleee Weelleeams 'we-chekoh weesh 'ue-peechowos Pewolew 'o meweemor weet soo nekey'.
    The man who performed the ceremony was the grandfather of Charlie Williams' mother, and was called the Old Man of Pewolew.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  125. Na'a'lee 'o'lehl 'o Wehlkwew tue' weet 'o megetohl kue roowo's.
    There were two houses at Wehlkwew and the pipes were kept in them.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  126. Kue roowo's weet soo wegenoyhl Pewolew 'o Roowo's.
    The pipes were called the Pipes of Pewolew.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  127. Nek soosek' 'n-esek' kwelekw weet mehl hee' Pewolew 'ohlkuemee kue roowo's pe'wol mehl hohkue'.
    I think it was called Pewolew because each pipe was made of soapstone (pe'wol).

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  128. Neemee ho negepue' nepuey 'o puelekw weet 'ue-weno'omehl kohchewech noohl ho k'ee cherwerseek' 'w-e'gor, kwelekw hegee' mocho 'oohl weesh kee nep' k'ee nepuey kwelekw kue 'ue-meworoyek' kue 'ue-pekoyek.
    During the season from the first to the seventh month salmon was not eaten at the mouth of the river, and it was said that if anyone did eat it his blood would flow away.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  129. Neekee kue weet 'o no'ohl 'emkee 'w-ohkepek', mos weeshtue' noo nep' kue maageen nepee'monee.
    So from then on at that time he went into training, and did not eat what other people ate.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  130. 'O gee' cho', Knokseemem' kue 'woogey son k'e-slekw; kolchee wohlkechee' tue' ko' 'o nerrgersem', weet kee chpee 'o nepem' kue meweemor 'we-romech 'ue-pewomek', 'ohlkuemee wok kem neeko'hl 'w-ohkepek' tue' wok kee chpee pew mehl kue nee'eeyen pegerk.
    He was told, Leave behind your white man's type of clothes; every morning you will gather sweathouse wood, and you will only eat the old man's niece's cooking, because she too was always in training and she alone cooked for the two men.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  131. Noohl 'o gee', Kerrcherh 'O Legokw' cho 'o nerrgersem', mee' weet 'o guenem' stowstek', maageen k'ee 'oohl kwelekw weesh neemee hegohkuemehl stowstek' 'ue-'weskwen neemee mehl hego'omah 'o 'er'gerrch.
    Then he was told, Go and gather sweathouse wood at Krrchrh 'O Legok'w, because small fir trees grew there, but other people did not pick their branches and did not use them for making fire in the sweathouse.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  132. Kwelekw 'o tenem' 'oohl 'o Wehlwkew heekoch so Rek'woy so wohpeyem', 'ohlkuemee weet 'eenee merogey' kee 'we-hloohl 'we-'yoh 'emsee 'ue-pa'ah 'ohlkuemee keech wee' laayekw keech 'o chahchew kee 'we-hloyek' 'yohlkoych' 'o puelekw.
    And then there were a lot of people who crossed over from Wehlkwew to Requa, as it was easier there for them to get their wood and their water now that the path was finished and it was difficult for wood to be fetched at the river mouth.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  133. Kue weet 'o 'w-o'oh 'eemee 'uema chkeem' kue 'ne-psech 'emsee kue meweemor, neekee wook noohl tegeruem' kue 'we-roowo's kue meweemor.
    That night the old man and my father did not sleep, and the old man spoke to his pipe until morning.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  134. Kue weet 'ue-koypoh wonews 'o sootokw' nue 'we-nerrgersek', noohl 'ap ho'omah.
    In the morning he went up to gather sweathouse wood, and then they made a fire.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  135. Noohl weet 'o soo chween meweemor 'w-egolek', Koweecho noo kegohchewow' kahkah; ke'ween cho' chpee kegoh, cho' neee'nowow' mehl nepuey.
    Then the old man said, Stop catching sturgeon; catch eels only, and watch for salmon.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  136. Keech maay' chomee's 'we-roo, 'o newee' keech sega'awor' 'o kue 'o rek'eeen; kwesee weet keet 'o weno'ee'mehl kue lemoluue'monee.
    Midday passed, and shadows were seen moving where they sat; it was the eel fishers coming.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  137. Kue 'ue-wey 'we-chween weet 'o soo newee' kue nepuey kolo neekee ko'see ko'moy'.
    When he finished speaking the salmon seemed to have heard it all.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  138. Cho' nuemee chpuerkoom' woneek k'e-soonek' weet nuemee 'o kwoytemel' cho 'olonemem'.
    Lift it up very carefully, and carry it like this right on your shoulder.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  139. Mocho weet keech ho neskwechoom' kue k'e-kesomewet 'o nekom kue k'e-ma'ah kue puelekw 'ne-le'moh, cho noohl kue k'e-kesomewet 'o lootem' kue nepuey.
    When you come to where you put your spear on your left shoulder when we came down to the river mouth, then throw the fish on to your left shoulder.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  140. 'O kue 'we-nekomewet laayekeen weet laatekwsom' mehl kue 'ue-mer'erx so kue 'we-tuuek; noohl 'o tekwsee' kue 'we-terr, noohl kue 'we-tuuek.
    She cut it along the line on its right from its gills to its tail; then its head was cut off, then its tail.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  141. To' 'elekw weet 'ee nuemee 'we-chahchew kee 'ue-meek'olew mee' kwelekw neekee mehl sega'agey' 'oohl.
    Well, it was difficult for anyone to swallow just because a man got rich by doing it.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  142. Weeshtue' weesh soo wa'sok 'w-esek' kwesee weet ho soo hoolem' 'oohl tue' kwelas keech ho noo weeshtue' ko hohkuem'.
    And so he was full of pity that this was how they the people had lived and now he himself had taken part.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  143. Kohchew keech 'o choomoyhl 'o neskwechokw' 'ue-me'loh mehl kue Heewow 'o tek 'o'lehl 'o Rek'woy nue 'we-chpegar', To's wee 'no-'o'hl keech kee 'na-'ahspee'moh 'emkee weet kee 'ne-soo 'e'gah?
    Six days passed and a relative of his came from the house at Hiwow in Requa, and asked, May we now drink at home, and eat as we usually do?

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  144. Noohl 'o gam', 'Ey kwelekw cho weet soo k'ookwsow' kue nuenepuey noohl ko 'o che'lohtemew.
    He said, Yes, cut up fish in the usual way, and you may dry it.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  145. Mocho kue kego'sneg 'emsee k'err' weesh mehl pelomeyehl kwelekw 'eemoksue tenem' kue nepuey kue weet 'we-loksee'hl.
    If the seagulls and crows fight over it there will not be much salmon that year.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  146. Kwelekw mocho weesh neenee rek'eeen 'eemee nepehl kwelekw weet kee 'we-tene'mek' nepuey kue weet 'we-loksee'hl.
    But if they sit around and do not eat, it means that salmon will be plentiful that year.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  147. 'Imee wo pelep' mehl wee' tue' 'enuemee ho tenem' nepuey 'o weet 'o no'ohl.
    There was no fighting over it, and salmon was very plentiful that season.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  148. Weet 'o newee' ke wee' kol' (?) nee hoo lo'omew, woneye'eek 'em laayetkoleem'.
    There appeared ... they went in every direction, they travelled in the air.

    — Lowana Brantner, Wohpekumew's Prediction (LA16-9, 1951)

  149. Neemee ho nepue' nepuey kue weet weno'omehl.
    People did not eat salmon during that season.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  150. Weet 'ee nuemee mehl 'we-chahchew.
    That is why it is difficult.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  151. Weet 'eenee merogey' kee 'we-hloohl we-'yoh.
    Thus it was easier for them to get their wood.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  152. Kue roowo's weet so wegenoyhl.
    That is what the pipes were called there.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  153. Weet me soo hegok'.
    That is how I went.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  154. Neemee hasee' weet 'ela keetee son'.
    It was not thought that it would happen like this.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  155. Tue' weet 'ee mehl 'w-ew wey' tege'muer.
    That is why its name is snowbird.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  156. Weet soo me gegok'.
    That is how I went.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  157. Mos wo gesee' weet 'ela keetee son'.
    It was not thought that it would happen like this.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  158. Kwelokw weet son'.
    That is how it happened.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  159. Weet 'ekw me soo hegok'.
    That is exactly how I went.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  160. Weet 'o soo chween kue meweemor.
    Then the old man spoke as follows.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  161. Wee'eeet kue sonowok', kee nuemee peleen nepuey, wee' kee nek w'eet kee chpee soo hlook' k'ee 'ue-ma'a'.
    That's what I'll do, I'll make myself into a very big salmon, that's the only way I can catch his spear.

    — Mary Marshall, Coyote and Crane (MM3, 1927)

  162. Kwesee' weet 'ap 'o chpeenah 'er'gerrch 'we-repokw.
    He waited by the doorway of the sweathouse.

    — Mary Marshall, Coyote Tries to Kill the Sun (MM4, 1927)

  163. Pekwtuehl weet 'okw' we'yon.
    At Pekwtuhl there lived an unmarried woman.

    — Mary Marshall, Medicine formula to get wealthy (MM5, 1927)

  164. 'O lem', Kwesee' weet 'ee mehl 'ne-'maayohl?
    He said, Is that why you abandoned me?

    — Mary Marshall, Medicine formula to get wealthy (MM5, 1927)

  165. 'Imee skewokseem' kee koleesh 'ue-komchuemek' kue 'ue-meyoomoyk'. Weet wohpueks 'o loot' nee kue '-uuekskeech kol' son'.
    She did not want anyone to know she was pregnant. So she threw her child who died in the water.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  166. Peeshtue' weet keech 'o nuemee mokw' 'we-neskweyowok', 'o nuemee mokw' 'we-neskwey.
    Then he became very sick, he was very sick.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  167. 'O lem', Kwelekw nek kee nepaanem', ko 'o lewolochem'. Kwelekw weet keech mehl sonowom'.
    It said, You will eat me and you will get well. This is why you have become like this.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  168. K'i chegee nue 'wo-sook hlmeyep'eer' tue' nepem'. Tue' weet keech k'e-me'womechkok'.
    You eat every kind of thing, even rattlesnakes. That is what you have become sick from.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  169. Keyomohl cho' ket'ohpeenem'. Cho' s'emem', tue' weet ko 'o so tegeruepaanem'.
    Cook (me) in a basket dipper. Pound me up, then you will talk to me.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  170. Kwelekw weet kee mehl hewolochem', mo wee'eeet tue' mehl slo'ehlkoom', keech mehl mokw' k'e-tewon. Wek hehl neee'nes k'e-'wes!
    You will get well from that, for you are thin, you no longer have flesh. Look at yourself!

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  171. Peeshtue' wee'eeetue weeshtue mehl ma son'. 'O lem': Kwelekw nek weet nee sonowok'.
    That is what he did with it. He said: Well, that is how I am.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  172. Pishtu' weet kee sonowoom' 'o'loolekweesh'ol. Weeshtue' ko 'o soneenee weeshtue' sonowohl 'o'loolekweesh.
    Human beings will do so. Human beings will act like this.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  173. Nekah kee sonowoom'. Weet 'wes'onah 'o knegon.
    We will do so. I am leaving it like that in the world.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  174. Peeshtue weetue 'o lesee', Chuehl, Weet kue 'o tektoy' wey' k'ee 'O Schegep', tue weetee emehl rek'eeenewor.
    Then what he thought was, Well, it will stand here at 'O Schegep', that is where it will sit.

    — Captain Spott, "The Obsidian Cliff at Rek'woy" (X16, 1907)

  175. Tue weet see soo hegohkue' neeegem.
    So they would have made obsidians.

    — Captain Spott, "The Obsidian Cliff at Rek'woy" (X16, 1907)

  176. Tue weet... nee menechok' Chahpcheeek.
    I disappear at Chahpchiik.

    — Captain Spott, Myth of Rock (Once a Woman) (Xd, 1907)

  177. Tue' chpee weet segon' kee 'we-'ohpew'ue-merw.
    That was the only way he fed him.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Turip Young Man and His Dogs" (dictated version) (I1, 1906)

  178. Noohl weet 'o hl'uerowom'.
    Then he stopped singing.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Turip Young Man and His Dogs" (dictated version) (I1, 1906)

  179. Noohl 'o tetolo'hl, weet 'o soo tetolo'hl.
    Then he cried, he cried like this.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Turip Young Man and His Dogs" (dictated version) (I1, 1906)

  180. Hesee Sa'ahl weet 'o menue'rogehl.
    They disappeared in the water there toward Sa'ahl.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Turip Young Man and His Dogs" (dictated version) (I1, 1906)

  181. Tu weet 'o chyue ho neee'nowor.
    Look there!

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Turip Young Man and His Dogs" (dictated version) (I1, 1906)

  182. Kwelekw weet kee no'opuehl k'ee wek hopkuereen.
    You must follow the one who's starting to swim here.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Turip Young Man and His Dogs" (dictated version) (I1, 1906)

  183. 'O new weet son' noohl neguerp tegoom'.
    He saw then ...

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Turip Young Man and His Dogs" (dictated version) (I1, 1906)

  184. Kwesee 'wes'onah k'ee wonoye'eek weet 'ee 'o puuekteek.
    And the deer was from the sky above.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Turip Young Man and His Dogs" (dictated version) (I1, 1906)

  185. Weet 'o soo tetolo' kue werhlker'eeshneg kwesee kue megokuemek'.
    That's how the wolves that had been dogs cried.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Turip Young Man and His Dogs" (dictated version) (I1, 1906)

  186. Weet 'ee nee 'okw' k'ee 'we-chye'wol leponohl.
    He had a flute under the ridge cover.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Wohpekumew's Flute Song" (I3, 1906)

  187. Mo weet keech weno'omoksee'hl nuemee wogeek 'ue-keeshen, nuemee meeek (?) soo tom' 'ue-keeshen, keech weesh 'o lo son'.
    When it was right in the middle of summer, it was at the height of summer, he did so.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Wohpekumew's Flute Song" (I3, 1906)

  188. Nek kwelekw weet sonowok'.
    I am that way.

    — Lame Billy, Gambling medicine formula (Ac, 1902)

  189. Peesh weet mehl hekchek'.
    That's why I spoke to you.

    — Lame Billy, Gambling medicine formula (Ac, 1902)

  190. ... weet kee sonowom' kee...

    — Lame Billy, Gambling medicine formula (Ac, 1902)

  191. kwee 'o ket'ue'logehl weet ko ko'o wesahpem'.
    You will wash in the lake.

    — Susie of Wechpus, Menstruation medicine (dictated) (SW1, 1902)

  192. We'yk'oh... Peesh, weet kee k'e-neskwechok', kee chpee kohchee pa'aahl sootom'.
    Now ... When you arrive, you will go in the water only once.

    — Susie of Wechpus, Menstruation medicine (dictated) (SW1, 1902)

  193. Weet kem keech noolenee mehl 'ahs k'ee mehl 'ahspeema, soneen keech meneykwenoomelek' 'ne-'wes.
    I can't drink what they drink because people are afraid of me."

    — Susie of Wechpus, Menstruation medicine (recorded) (SW2, 1902)