Yurok dictionary

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keet

Dictionary entry

keetpv • near future time

Lexicon record # 910 | Source reference: R207

Sentence examples (74)

  1. 'Ochkaa pe-kwo-luem' kue 'wo-leehl. Keet ho-leem' 'we-no-'os.
    Right now she's peeling her hazel sticks. She's going to make a baby basket.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (LC-01-1) (LC-01-1, 2007)

  2. Keech kwes-kwe-sek'. Keet kwes-kwe-sek'.
    I have a cold. I am catching a cold.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (AG-07-1) (AG-07-1, 2006)

  3. Keet kwes-kwe-sek'.
    I am catching a cold.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (AG-07-1) (AG-07-1, 2006)

  4. Keet te-lek'.
    I am getting sick.

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    — Jimmie James, Sentences (AG-07-1) (AG-07-1, 2006)

  5. Tue' wee-'eeet, 'o ge'm, weet keet 'nah-pew.
    That one, he said, she will be my wife.

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    — Georgiana Trull, Moon and His Wife (GT2, 2003)

  6. Kues kwe-nee keet 'wes-'on!
    For heaven's sake. (woman)

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 7: "Okay. Expressions" (GT3-07, 2003)

  7. He'-wo-nee'-hles! K'e-met-'eek keet soo-to'.
    Wake up! Get your hind end out of bed.

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 10: "Comb your hair. Daily routines" (GT3-10, 2003)

  8. Keet he-gehl-pa'.
    The water is rising.

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 17: "How's the weather? (Look at the sky.)" (GT3-17, 2003)

  9. Keet hlkoo-lon kee pa-'ah.
    The water is muddy.

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 17: "How's the weather? (Look at the sky.)" (GT3-17, 2003)

  10. Keet ho-'oh.
    It's getting dark.

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    — Georgiana Trull, Yurok Language Conversation Book, chapter 19: "What time is it?" (GT3-19, 2003)

  11. Keet woh-pe'y.
    (S)he is coming across.

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    — Aileen Figueroa, Elicited Sentences with oo-Class Verbs (JB-14-1, 2003)

  12. Keet 'o woh-pey-yek'.
    I'm coming across.

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    — Aileen Figueroa, Elicited Sentences with oo-Class Verbs (JB-14-1, 2003)

  13. Keet mer-ter-lerp'.
    Her nose is runny.

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    — Aileen Figueroa, Elicited Sentences with oo-Class Verbs (JB-14-1, 2003)

  14. Keet 'e-pok'.
    I am choking.

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    — Aileen Figueroa, Sentences (JB-01-04) (JB-01-04, 2001)

  15. Kue pe-gerk keet kem'.
    That man is stealing.

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    — Aileen Figueroa, Sentences (JB-01-04) (JB-01-04, 2001)

  16. Keet me-weyr.
    The swelling is going down.

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    — Aileen Figueroa, Sentences (JB-01-04) (JB-01-04, 2001)

  17. To's keet nes-kwey-yo-wom'.
    Now you're getting outrageous.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-026) (LA138-026, 1980)

  18. Keet me-ne-ko-let.
    I'm freezing.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-035) (LA138-035, 1980)

  19. Keet wo hoh-choo'.
    You're bragging.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-038) (LA138-038, 1980)

  20. Keet 'uemoy, keet 'ue-moy-kek', keet 'ue-moy-ke'-mek'.
    They're starting to die.

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-040) (LA138-040, 1980)

  21. Keet pe-rey-yo-wok'.
    I am getting old (a woman).

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    — Florence Shaughnessy, Sentences (LA138-050) (LA138-050, 1980)

  22. Kwe-see keech no'p-'e-nee' ner-'er-'eryhl kue otter wee-'eeet to' keet 'o ske-lee le-chee' kue 'nech-'eesh.
    He chased two otters, and my dog fell down.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Otters" (LA181-2, 1986)

  23. Noohl kem 'o le'-moh tue' won keet ke-ro-mok-see'hl.
    Then we set out again and it started to turn differently (?).

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "Driving My Father to the Doctor as a Child" (LA181-4, 1986)

  24. Kwe-lekw keech nek he-sek' pue-lekw wo-'oot tue' weesh keet hoh-kuem' 'ue-kaa-mo-pek''o pue-lekw.
    I think that's what started to make the mouth of the river rough.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Klamath Bridge" (LA181-10, 1986)

  25. Keet kwech-keesh
    He's shitting

    — Frank Douglas, Sentences (FD-WB) (FD-WB, 1960s)

  26. 'O noo-wor' kue 'ee nue 'er'-gerp 'we-go-lek', Kwe-lekw keet meyr-ke-wech' kue me-wee-mor.
    A messenger ran up saying, The old man is going to die.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Mourning Dove" (LA16-1, 1951)

  27. Kwe-see kem 'o noo-wor' 'we-go-yek', Kwe-lekw cho hee-moo-rey-yo-wom'! Kwe-lekw keet meyr-ke-wech' kue k'e-pee-cho-wos.
    And again someone ran up telling him, Well, hurry! Your grandfather is going to die.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Mourning Dove" (LA16-1, 1951)

  28. Tue' nee shoo nee-kee ko'-moy' kue keet 'we-rue-ro-woom'.
    And then he heard them begin to sing.

    — Bessie Fleischman, "The Story of the Klamath River Song" (LA16-2, 1951)

  29. Tue' kel' 'o so kor' nee-mee kee rue-ro-wom' keet chpee k'e-we-gaa-ney-yoo-chek' k'ee nee te-geyt-ko'hl kee shoo he-we-chem'.
    But you alone will not be able to sing so that you will just make noise foretelling evil in the canyons (and) so you will live.

    — Robert Spott, "The Owl" (LA16-4, 1951)

  30. K'ehl nue-mee tom' kue me-wah, kwe-see keet 'o pel' weet 'o son' kes-kee chpee nee ye-gokw' mos wey 'ue-kert-kerk'.
    The boy was very small, but as he began to grow up it turned out that all he would do was to go down to the water's edge and was never done with fishing for trout.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  31. Tue' keet 'o skuey' soo 'okw' kue pe-rey mee' nee-ko'hl kol' 'we-so'nk-'e-nek' kue me-wah.
    And then the old woman began to live better because the boy was always catching something in his fishing.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  32. Keet 'o pel' 'em-kee k'ee too-me-nee so-no-wo-nee ch'uech-'eesh tue' nue-mee chue ke-goh-chew', kem 'o gem' kue pe-rey:
    He began to get bigger and then he would catch all sorts of birds, and the old woman said:

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  33. Kwe-see noohl 'o ne-wom' 'we-sek' kwe-lekw pue-le-kuek wee keet 'we-son-cho-yek'.
    Then he saw that it was being taken down the river.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  34. 'Inee kee cho kwe-lekw te-noo kee mehl 'e'-gah k'ee kwe-nee keet 'we-le'-mehl.
    There is bound to be plenty more to eat wherever they are going.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  35. Kue 'O Re-gos keet 'o maa-yo-new kue 'yoch, kwe-see wee-'eeet 'yon-cheek 'o ko ho myah Se-gep noohl wo-nekw mehl te-kwo-nuer'.
    It was just going to pass the rock, and Coyote jumped in and came crashing down from high up into it.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  36. Chee now soot-'os! Kwehl kem keet ke-mo-lem' nee wee'.
    Be off! You are just going to steal again.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The Young Man from Serper" (LA16-7, 1951)

  37. Kue keech 'o nuue'-mo-nee 'woo-gey keet 'e-mehl me-guehl-ko-chehl tue' nee-mee weesh wo ske-wok wee' 'we-sook kue nek 'nep-sech.
    But after the arrival of white men the Indians began to sell them, though my father never liked that sort of thing.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  38. Kue keech 'ue-me-che-wo-lo' noohl lekw-seesh 'o le'-mehl 'em-kee weesh-tue' 'ee kmoyhl, keet 'o ko saa-we-lehl, noohl 'e-see me we-ge-sah.
    When it had burned down they went outside and lay down, and began to cool off, and then they went to bathe.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  39. Keech maay' cho-mee's 'we-roo, 'o ne-wee' keech se-ga-'a-wor' 'o kue 'o rek-'eeen; kwe-see weet keet 'o we-no-'ee'-mehl kue le-mo-luue'-mo-nee.
    Midday passed, and shadows were seen moving where they sat; it was the eel fishers coming.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  40. Won' keech son' keet 'ue wook kem 'o ge-gokw' kue 'nep-sech kue 'we-nerr-ger-sek'.
    Before daybreak even it happened that my father went out to gather sweathouse wood.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  41. Mo-cho keet mo-'okw' 'noh-kuem 'em-see 'ne'-wo'hl-p'ey' che-gey-chekw kue ne-puey kue che'-lo-nee 'o 'o's-'o' kue roo-wo's.
    When I have no tobacco and no angelica root, I give the dried salmon to the pipes in little pieces.

    — Florence Shaughnessy, "The First Salmon Rite at Wehlkwew" (LA16-8, 1951)

  42. Keet he-go-'o-mah cho' nuue'-mehl.
    They arrived just as we were making the fires.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  43. Ne-wook' keet 'ne-le-koo-me-lek'.
    I saw I was about to be stabbed.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  44. 'Ne-che-wes keet tment-men.
    My hand has started to throb.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  45. Mep ne-wook' keet 'we-go-'o-mah.
    I was in time to see them starting to light the fires.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  46. To's keet he-we-chem'?
    Are you beginning to get better?

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  47. Keet po-'oh 'ne-meehl.
    My leg is healing.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  48. Keet chke-nem' k'ee puuek 'o wee-'eeet.
    The deer are beginning to get scarce there.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  49. Noohl keet saa-we-lehl.
    Then they began to cool off.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  50. Noohl ne-wom' 'we-sek' kwe-lekw pue-le-kuek keet 'we-son-cho-yek'.
    Then he saw it begin to be paddled down stream.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  51. Ko ne-wook' keet 'wehl-mey-yo-wohl noohl 'o ke-mey-yek'.
    I saw that they were getting nasty, so I went home.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  52. Keet he-go-'o-mah cho' nuue'-mehl yo'hl-koh.
    They arrived just as we were making the fires.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  53. Keet 'o wook.
    It is just before dawn.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  54. Keet 'o chmey' 'o nerr-ger's.
    As evening fell he gathered sweathouse wood.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  55. Nah-chee-chek' k'e-cheeek ko-lo won keet nee sho-no-wom'.
    I have given you your money, you seem to be starting to act rather queerly about it.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  56. Keet nue che-ge'-loh-sek'.
    I am going to gather seaweed.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  57. Ne-kah keet nue tmeee-go'.
    We are just off hunting.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  58. Kue me-raa keet mehl te-lek'.
    I am getting ill from the smoke.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  59. Keet mee wo mer-'er-nee' kue mue-lah.
    That horse cannot be overtaken.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  60. To' kwehl keet ma-'a-nor.
    There he is starting to show off.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  61. 'Inee kee cho te-noo kee mehl 'e'-gah k'ee kwe-nee keet 'we-le'-mehl.
    There is bound to be plenty more to eat wherever they are going.

    — Various speakers, Sentences in R. H. Robins's Yurok Language (YL, 1951)

  62. Keet ror'
    It snows.

    — Mary Marshall, Sentences (ES) (ES, 1927)

  63. Keet nes-kwe-chokw'.
    He's coming.

    — Mary Marshall, Sentences (ES) (ES, 1927)

  64. Keet kwerm-hlerh-chek.'
    I'm looking back.

    — Mary Marshall, Sentences (ES) (ES, 1927)

  65. Keet kwerm-hlerh-chers!
    Look back!

    — Mary Marshall, Sentences (ES) (ES, 1927)

  66. Kwe-see' 'o ne-wee' Se-gep keet nes.
    Then they saw Coyote coming.

    — Mary Marshall, Coyote and Crane (MM3, 1927)

  67. Kwe-see' kee-mohl 'o ko'-mo-yom' keet pe-gah-che-wom' 'o 'o'-le-peek.
    Sure enough, he heard her moving inside the house.

    — Mary Marshall, Medicine formula to get wealthy (MM5, 1927)

  68. Keet tue' ne-wor.
    Now it dawned.

    — Mary Marshall, Medicine formula to get wealthy (MM5, 1927)

  69. Kwe-see weesh-tue 'o ho nes-kwe-chokw' Ho-'o-wen. Ho-'o-wens ho nes-kwe-chokw'. Prwer'-k'uek keet wo soo-to' mo-kee.
    That is how he came to Ho'owen. He came to Ho'owen. He was going south then.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Buzzard's Medicine" (I4, 1907)

  70. K'ee kwen keet 'o lue-no-yohl kwen he-wo-nee 'o noh-sue-no-wo-nee k'ee 'wes-'o-nah.
    Wherever I transform to, I come from the heavens.

    — Captain Spott, Myth of Rock (Once a Woman) (Xd, 1907)

  71. Kwe-see keet re-chokw' nee-kee woohl kyue hop-kuer'.
    And then it started to swim there.

    — Domingo of Weitchpec, "Turip Young Man and His Dogs" (dictated version) (I1, 1906)

  72. Tue kwe-lekw wee-tee noohl keet nee k'e-gok', 'o'-loo-le-kwee-shol, so-nee-nee keech hlmey-yor-kwoo-me-lek' 'ne'-wes, 'o'-loo-le-kwee-shol .
    That's where you going, human being, because they fear you so, village dweller.

    — Susie of Wechpus, Menstruation medicine (recorded) (SW2, 1902)